Faculty in the News - Archive



Monday, May 8, 2006

Professor Douglas Colbert

The Baltimore Sun – Though three lawyers are serving as his standby counsel, John Muhammad, whose trial on six counts of first-degree murder is under way in Montgomery County, is representing himself, as he did for a small part of his trial in Virginia. Douglas Colbert, JD, professor at the School of Law, believes that those who represent themselves in criminal cases are often mentally impaired or, at least, deeply idiosyncratic.

Monday, May 8, 2006

Kate Christensen

WBFF-TV – Officials at BWI Thurgood Marshall Airport are considering the federally managed Registered Traveler program that allows travelers to bypass long security lines, which by paying a fee to use a separate express lane. Kate Christensen, JD, assistant director of the University of Maryland Center for Health and Homeland Security at the School of Law, says the security agency "has done extensive background checks" and will be using iris scans and thumb prints to confirm identities.

Sunday, May 7, 2006

Professor Michael Greenberger

The Richmond Times-Dispatch – Despite tapping into the vast resources of American law enforcement, prosecutors could not produce any evidence showing that Zacarious Moussaoui was directly involved in the Sept.11, 2001, terrorist attacks, aside from the defendant’s own boastful claims. "I think it was a case of overreaching," said Michael Greenberger, JD, professor at the School of Law and director of the Center for Health and Homeland Security. "The government knew they had a marginal player. But they were anxious to have a trophy to show they were doing something."

Friday, May 5, 2006

Professor Michael Greenberger

The New York Times – Legal analysts say the terrorism trial of Zacarias Moussaoui, built on a novel legal theory, was marked by prosecutorial stumbles and involved a defendant whose conduct throughout seemed a determined effort to dig his own grave. Yet the case ultimately followed the pattern of most federal capital cases, with juries reluctant to impose death sentences. "Obtaining the death penalty is not easy," said Michael Greenberger, JD, professor at the School of Law and director of the Center for Health and Homeland Security. "If politics had been taken out of this and they weren’t looking for a trophy case, they never would have taken this case to the jury."

Thursday, May 4, 2006

Professor Michael Greenberger

USA Today, The Los Angeles Times, 42 more newspapers, "The Morning Edition," National Public Radio - A federal jury sentenced convicted Al Qaeda conspirator Zacarias Moussaoui to life in prison after failing to reach a unanimous decision that he be executed for his role in the attacks. Several legal analysts said that the federal government essentially gambled on linking him to the Sept. 11, 2001, attacks to try to have him executed and lost. "They never should have tried to go for the ultimate sanction," said Michael Greenberger, JD, professor at the School of Law and director of the Center for Health and Homeland Security. "They could have gotten a life sentence and claimed victory without all this."

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500 W. Baltimore Street, Baltimore, MD 21201-1786 PHONE: (410) 706-7214 FAX: (410) 706-4045 / TDD: (410) 706-7714

Copyright © 2014, University of Maryland Francis King Carey School of Law. All Rights Reserved