Faculty in the News - Archive



Monday, July 3, 2006

Professor Michael Greenberger

The National Law Journal – The U.S. Supreme Court has ruled that wartime tribunals created to try detainees at Guantanamo Bay are not valid under U.S. law or international treaties. "The President’s assertions that he has unfettered power in the war on terror were brought to a screeching halt by the court," said Michael Greenberger, JD, professor at the School of Law and director of the Center for Health and Homeland Security.

Saturday, July 1, 2006

Dean Karen Rothenberg

The Baltimore Sun – A new law providing $15 million in state funds for stem cell research is now in place, and the names of 11 of the 15 commissioners including Karen H. Rothenberg, JD, MPA, dean of the School of Law who will decide how the research dollars will be spent have been submitted to the state.

Friday, June 30, 2006

Professor Michael Greenberger

The New York Times – The Supreme Court’s ruling in Hamdan v. Rumsfeld was the most significant setback yet for the Bush administration’s contention that the Sept. 11, 2001, terrorist attacks and their aftermath have justified one of the broadest expansions of presidential power in American history. "The court really rescued the administration by taking it out of this quagmire it’s been in," said Michael Greenberger, JD, professor at the School of Law and director of the Center for Health and Homeland Security.

Friday, June 30, 2006

Professor Michael Greenberger

The Baltimore Sun (editorial) – After the U.S. Supreme Court’s ruling in Hamdan v. Rumsfeld, some in Congress want to rewrite the law to allow the Guantanamo tribunals to go forward. "Here’s a better idea: Michael Greenberger, JD, professor at the School of Law and director of the Center for Health and Homeland Security says the U.S. should simply recognize the 460 men at Guantanamo as prisoners of war and ship them to a mainland camp, to be dealt with in accord with the Geneva Conventions. It does no harm, it conforms to the rule of law, and it’s entirely sensible."

Friday, June 30, 2006

Professor Michael Greenberger

The Baltimore Sun – The Supreme Court ruled yesterday that wartime tribunals created to try detainees at Guantanamo Bay are not valid under U.S. law or international treaties. Michael Greenberger, JD, professor at the School of Law and director of the Center for Health and Homeland Security, said trials of the detainees could proceed without changing current law. "For those who have really violated the law of war, they could quickly get convictions in public court-martial proceedings and accomplish that objective," he said.

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500 W. Baltimore Street, Baltimore, MD 21201-1786 PHONE: (410) 706-7214 FAX: (410) 706-4045 / TDD: (410) 706-7714

Copyright © 2014, University of Maryland Francis King Carey School of Law. All Rights Reserved