Faculty in the News - Archive



Monday, September 11, 2006

Professor Michael Greenberger

The Christian Science Monitor – Five years after Sept. 11, New York City has emerged as an international leader in urban security and counterterrorism measures. On any given day, more than 1,000 uniformed officers are tasked with ensuring that the city still the world’s No. 1 terrorist target, according to analysts is doing everything in its power to prevent another attack. "The approach taken by the city of New York is absolutely essential," said Michael Greenberger, JD, professor at the School of Law and director of the Center for Health and Homeland Security. "On a broad array of issues, the federal government has let the states and cities down."

Monday, September 11, 2006

Professor Michael Greenberger

Investor’s Business Daily – In the five years since the events of Sept. 11 awakened Americans to the threat of large-scale terrorist attacks, things haven’t quite gone as biotech companies, public health experts, and security analysts hoped or anticipated. The U.S. government has yet to make an assessment as to whether anthrax and botulism are more serious threats than radiation, according to Michael Greenberger, JD, professor at the School of Law and director of the Center for Health and Homeland Security.

Sunday, September 10, 2006

Professor Michael Greenberger

U.S. News & World Report – President George W. Bush is putting pressure on Congress to quickly approve a revised system for military tribunals for enemy combatants that could pass constitutional muster. The standards Congress adopts, said Michael Greenberger, JD, professor at the School of Law and director of the Center for Health and Homeland Security, could set precedents elsewhere. "No one said this stuff is easy," he said.

Sunday, September 10, 2006

Professor Michael Greenberger

The Baltimore Sun – The terrorist attacks of Sept. 11 changed not only the country but corporate America as well particularly companies with offices near Washington, D.C. The University of Maryland Center for Health and Homeland Security at the School of Law, formed six months after Sept. 11, has expanded its staff from one to 25. Its work includes training first-responder agencies to plan how to continue operating after a disaster. "It’s a sector that’s growing very, very rapidly," said Michael Greenberger, JD, professor at the School of Law and director of the Center.

Sunday, September 10, 2006

Professor Michael Greenberger

The Baltimore Sun, The Daily Herald (Everette, Wash.) – One of the most important keys to the country’s response to Sept. 11 was the combination of the attack being seen as an attack on the nation and thus on all citizens and as one that claimed the innocent, the harmless, the unarmed. "It was a searing national experience," said Michael Greenberger, JD, professor at the School of Law and director of the Center for Health and Homeland Security. "I really think that it had more effect on the national psyche than Pearl Harbor did in 1941."

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500 W. Baltimore Street, Baltimore, MD 21201-1786 PHONE: (410) 706-7214 FAX: (410) 706-4045 / TDD: (410) 706-7714

Copyright © 2014, University of Maryland Francis King Carey School of Law. All Rights Reserved