Faculty in the News - Archive



Wednesday, September 13, 2006

Professor Michael Greenberger

WFED-AM – In this live interview, Michael Greenberger, JD, professor at the School of Law and director of the Center for Health and Homeland Security, talked about aviation security and what the federal government needs to do to improve technology for screening and detection.

Wednesday, September 13, 2006

Professor Sherrilyn Ifill

WBFF-TV – Sherrilyn Ifill, JD, associate professor at the School of Law, analyzed how the issue of education will affect the race for Maryland’s governor.

Tuesday, September 12, 2006

Professor Sherrilyn Ifill

The Baltimore Sun – For the first time in more than a decade, Tuesday’s primary election promises plenty of drama, with key match-ups in federal and statewide races. "It’s an important time for Maryland, a generational time in terms of leadership," said Sherrilyn Ifill, JD, associate professor at the School of Law. "One of the wonderful things about Maryland and Baltimore in particular is the loyalty we have to our leaders from the past. It also happens to be a weakness in that sometimes we’re not sufficiently prepared for new ideas."

Tuesday, September 12, 2006

Senior Judicial Fellow Judge John Fader II

The Daily Record – The Maryland Court of Special Appeals’ decision to uphold a Howard County murder conviction despite the fact that a juror at the trial was a non-citizen raises questions about the effectiveness of the current process and defendants’ rights to be judged by a jury of their peers. "The big question is, what are Maryland politicians going to do about that?" asked John Fader II, JD, senior judicial fellow and lecturer at the School of Law. "What’s going to happen even if the attorney says, ‘I want to ask each person at the bench if they are a citizen’?" Christopher Flohr, JD, an adjunct professor at the School of Law and president of the Maryland Criminal Defense Attorneys Association, argued that problems such as the one demonstrated in this case could be avoided if lawyers, rather than judges, conduct the questioning of jurors.

Tuesday, September 12, 2006

Adjunct Professor Christopher Flohr

The Daily Record – The Maryland Court of Special Appeals’ decision to uphold a Howard County murder conviction despite the fact that a juror at the trial was a non-citizen raises questions about the effectiveness of the current process and defendants’ rights to be judged by a jury of their peers. "The big question is, what are Maryland politicians going to do about that?" asked John Fader II, JD, senior judicial fellow and lecturer at the School of Law. "What’s going to happen even if the attorney says, ‘I want to ask each person at the bench if they are a citizen’?" Christopher Flohr, JD, an adjunct professor at the School of Law and president of the Maryland Criminal Defense Attorneys Association, argued that problems such as the one demonstrated in this case could be avoided if lawyers, rather than judges, conduct the questioning of jurors.

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500 W. Baltimore Street, Baltimore, MD 21201-1786 PHONE: (410) 706-7214 FAX: (410) 706-4045 / TDD: (410) 706-7714

Copyright © 2014, University of Maryland Francis King Carey School of Law. All Rights Reserved