Faculty in the News - Archive



Monday, January 9, 2006

Professor Sherrilyn Ifill

The Buffalo News The future of the U.S. Supreme Court and of presidential power, abortion, and civil rights appears to be at stake today in a Capitol Hill committee room, as the Senate Judiciary Committee begins hearings on the nomination of Samuel A. Alito Jr. to the nation's top court. In addition to opposing racial and ethic quotas, Alito has tended to rule against claims of racial discrimination, said Sherrilyn Ifill, JD, associate professor at the School of Law.

Monday, January 9, 2006

Professor Michael Greenberger

The Associated Press, and three more newspapers and Web sites - A U.S. Department of Justice report that faulted the FBI for sloppy work may strengthen a lawsuit filed against the agency by a Portland man who was arrested after his fingerprints were mistakenly identified during the investigation into the 2004 Madrid train bombings. Michael Greenberger, JD, professor at the School of Law and director of the University of Maryland Center for Health and Homeland Security, said the delay in correcting the mistake may be ammunition for Brandon Mayfield to argue there was pressure to make an arrest.

Saturday, January 7, 2006

University of Maryland System

The Baltimore Sun The University of Maryland board of regents voted yesterday to raise tuition at most campuses next fall, the smallest increase in recent years. Tuition at nine of the university system's 11 campuses will go up by 4.5 percent next year. Graduate students, however, did not fare as well. Those increases are larger, with University of Maryland law students paying an additional 8 percent next year.

Friday, January 6, 2006

Adjunct Professor James Astrachan

The Daily Record James Astrachan, JD, an adjunct professor at the School of Law, wrote an opinion column explaining how copyrights can be violated by direct infringement and contributory infringement.

Thursday, January 5, 2006

Professor Michael Greenberger

The Christian Science Monitor, ABCnews.com The Department of Homeland Security has announced that even cities at the highest risk of a terrorist attack will have to prove exactly why they need homeland-security grants and demonstrate how the money will improve the nation's overall preparedness. "As we move further from 9/11 and see that the money has often been used unwisely...it is very necessary to put people to the test," said Michael Greenberger, JD, professor at the School of Law and director of the University of Maryland Center for Health and Homeland Security.

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500 W. Baltimore Street, Baltimore, MD 21201-1786 PHONE: (410) 706-7214 FAX: (410) 706-4045 / TDD: (410) 706-7714

Copyright © 2014, University of Maryland Francis King Carey School of Law. All Rights Reserved