From the 2009 News Archive
Print this page      E-mail this story      Bookmark and Share

Derivatives Course Garners National Media Attention

The ongoing global financial crisis has spurred an increase in student demand for law courses on derivatives, the complex instruments that crippled credit markets and wreaked havoc on bank balance sheets. In a May 7 feature article about growing student interest in derivatives law, Reuters profiled "Futures, Options, and Derivatives," a course taught by Professor Michael Greenberger at the School of Law.

According to the story, students are "hungry to decipher how derivatives contributed to the crisis and excited about the prospect of being involved in the regulatory overhaul that could lead to a new phase in the history of global finance."

"I wanted to understand how it happened and what it will mean for our future ... and what we can do to make sure it doesn't happen again," said Meaghan McCann, one of Prof. Greenberger’s students.

When Prof. Greenberger started the class in 2007, 20 students applied for 25 spaces and the course was only offered in the spring. In 2009, the class was offered in both semesters, and 101 students enrolled.

That number includes Max Romanik, who said the class is especially gratifying because the subject matter is ripped from headlines.

"It's a great experience when the professor can walk in with a statute that came off the presses that day. You don't have to study bizarre hypotheticals. The real world is happening all around you right now," said Romanik.

Prof. Greenberger is a former director of the Division of Trading and Markets at the Commodity Futures Trading Commission, and he is currently serving as a Technical Advisor to the United Nations Commission of Experts of the President of the UN General Assembly on Reforms of the International Monetary and Financial System. He has testified on Capitol Hill 11 times since 2006 on dysfunctions in financial markets, and he most recently testified before the U.S. House Committee on Agriculture in support of the Derivatives Market Transparency Accountability Act of 2009.

Read the full Reuters article.


Print this page      E-mail this story      Bookmark and Share

Back To Top

500 W. Baltimore Street, Baltimore, MD 21201-1786 PHONE: (410) 706-7214 FAX: (410) 706-4045 / TDD: (410) 706-7714
Copyright © 2014, University of Maryland Francis King Carey School of Law. All Rights Reserved.

Hotline Hotline



UM | About This Site | Site Map | Contact Us


500 W. Baltimore Street, Baltimore, MD 21201-1786 PHONE: (410) 706-7214 FAX: (410) 706-4045 / TDD: (410) 706-7714

Copyright © 2014, University of Maryland Francis King Carey School of Law. All Rights Reserved