From the 2009 News Archive
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C. Fraser Smith, Others to Speak at Thurgood Marshall Lecture

Every year Maryland Law's student government, the Student Bar Association, hosts the Thurgood Marshall Lecture Series to honor Marshall and his legacy. This year, C. Fraser Smith, author of Here Lies Jim Crow: Civil Rights in Maryland, WYPR's news director and former Baltimore Sun columnist, will join local civil rights leaders Ralph Moore, Jr., and Kenneth Montague, Jr. to deliver the Student Bar Association’s annual Thurgood Marshal Lecture on March 30 at 4 p.m. in the Ceremonial Courtroom.

Here Lies Jim Crow: Civil Rights in Maryland, traces the roots of Jim Crow laws from Dred Scott to Plessy v. Ferguson. Using examples of lesser known, but no less important, civil rights advocates in Maryland, Smith recounts the early efforts of those who struggled to establish freedom and basic rights for African Americans in Maryland.

Ralph Moore, Jr. is currently the director of the St. Frances Academy Community Center which was established in 1828 to serve disenfranchised young people – the enslaved, the orphaned, the segregated, the immigrant and the poor. Mr. Moore was one of only four African America students at the predominantly white Loyola High School in Towson when Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. was assassinated. The experience radicalized him and a few of his black classmates, and he has since dedicated his life to serving others.

Kenneth Montague, Jr., '77, currently a partner at Montague & Taler, has also spent his entire life advancing the causes of equality and social justice. From 1967-1971 he served as a Peace Corps Volunteer in Losotho, South Africa. He was a reform-minded child advocate in the Maryland General Assembly from 1987 through 2002 and later served as the state of Maryland's Secretary of Juvenile Services from July 2003 to January 2007. While still part of the Thurgood Marshall Lecture Series, this year's event provides each of the three panelists an opportunity to share their own personal experiences during the Civil Rights struggle in Maryland and then be available for a question and answer session. The event, free and open to the public, promises to be insightful, provocative and informative.


Bryan Pugh on March 24, 2009

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Copyright © 2014, University of Maryland Francis King Carey School of Law. All Rights Reserved