Programs & Centers

Cybersecurity Program

What is Cybersecurity?

The world’s increasing connectivity presents much promise. Yet, the dependence on digital networks also leads to greater vulnerabilities. Cyber attacks perpetrated by state actors, terrorists, cyber criminals, or hacktivists are becoming more frequent and these attacks have a substantial national security and economic impact. Critical infrastructure that provides essential services like power, water, telecommunication, and banking must be protected. Plus, solutions need to be developed to safeguard from data breaches that reveal personally identifiable information, valuable intellectual property, or other sensitive information. Cybersecurity is a dynamic field that touches all sectors of society.

Why Law and Policy of Cybersecurity?

Cybersecurity is not achieved merely through technical capabilities. There are an abundance of laws (now in effect, or proposed), regulations, guidelines, standard operating procedures, and best practices that must be understood to become cyber-secure. Government must consider the effectiveness of legal standards, national security, and privacy protections when drafting legislation or issuing regulations. Businesses must know the legal requirements that they have to follow to protect their networks and data, and must know their obligations if they suffer a cyber attack.

The cybersecurity curriculum at the University of Maryland Francis King Carey School of Law will cover topics such as defining cybersecurity, identifying threats and actors, internet governance and jurisdiction, cyber crime, data breach, as well as current and proposed cybersecurity legislation, policies, and regulations.

The State of Maryland is the epicenter for cybersecurity as it is the home to leading governmental cyber agencies such as the National Security Agency, U.S. Cyber Command, the National Institute of Standards and Technology (which sets cyber standards), and the National Cybersecurity Center of Excellence. Maryland is also home to a significant number of private sector cybersecurity firms. Professionals with a grasp of cybersecurity laws and policies are in demand, but in short supply.

Courses at the University of Maryland Francis King Carey School of Law are complemented by access to the distinguished University of Maryland Center for Health and Homeland Security, which melds academic and practical expertise for individuals who wish to become proficient in the law and policy of cybersecurity. 

Courses

  • The Law and Policy of Cybersecurity
  • The Law and Policy of Cyber Crime

    The Law and Policy of Cyber Crime explores the legal, regulatory, and policy issues of cyber crime. The course will define cyber crime, teach students about types of cyber crime, and inform them on the methods of cyber criminals. The course distinguishes itself from the introductory law and policy of cybersecurity course in that it will not only offer an analysis of the legal, regulatory, and policy issues with which students may be confronted in their places of work, but also offer them practical solutions to preventing and responding to cyber crime. Students will learn about resources and best practices that they can easily apply to the context of their own jobs, academic research, and other practical, real-life situations.

  • NSA, Foreign Intelligence, and Privacy
  • Homeland Security and Counterterrorism

Degree Programs

Students at the University of Maryland Carey Law can study cybersecurity in three different degree programs:

Faculty


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Copyright © 2017, University of Maryland Francis King Carey School of Law. All Rights Reserved.

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500 W. Baltimore Street, Baltimore, MD 21201-1786 PHONE: (410) 706-7214 FAX: (410) 706-4045 / TDD: (410) 706-7714

Admissions: PHONE: (410) 706-3492 FAX: (410) 706-1793

Copyright © 2017, University of Maryland Francis King Carey School of Law. All Rights Reserved