Faculty in the News - Archive



Tuesday, June 16, 2009

Professor Kathleen Dachille

The New York Times - The marketing and advertising restrictions in the tobacco law that Congress passed last week are likely to be challenged in court on free-speech grounds. But supporters of the legislation say they drafted the law carefully to comply with the First Amendment. Kathleen Dachille, JD, an associate professor at the School of Law and director of the Legal Resource Center for Tobacco Regulation, Litigation and Advocacy, said the Massachusetts case turned on a lack of evidence linking youth smoking, which is illegal, to tobacco marketing ostensibly aimed at adults.

Tuesday, June 16, 2009

Professor Rena Steinzor

The Baltimore Sun - A Washington-based think tank is calling for what sounds like "tough love" to save the Chesapeake Bay from the 26-year trail of broken promises left by federal and state officials, who have repeatedly failed to meet self-imposed deadlines for cleaning up North America's largest estuary. "Without something like this, without consequences that people are really afraid of, nothing's going to change," argues Rena Steinzor, JD, a professor at the School of Law and president of the Center for Progressive Reform.

Thursday, June 11, 2009

Professor Paula Monopoli

Miller-McCune.com - Sotomayor would actually be contributing to one kind of homogeneity on the court: It is increasingly dominated by former Circuit Court of Appeals judges with Ivy League law degrees. Conservatives championed these criteria during the Bush Administration, in dispatching nominee Harriet Miers and confirming John Roberts and Samuel Alito. "The great irony here is they set up these de facto credentials for being a Supreme Court justice that don't exist in the Constitution," said School of Law Professor Paula Monopoli, JD.

Thursday, June 11, 2009

Professor Michael Greenberger

WTTG TV, Ch. 5 (Washington, D.C.) - Michael Greenberger, JD, a professor at the School of Law and the director of the Center for Health and Homeland Security, is quoted in a story about the fatal shooting of a security guard at the U.S. Holocaust Memorial Museum by a self-professed white supremacist.

Wednesday, June 10, 2009

Professor Michael Greenberger

WUSA TV, Ch. 9 (Washington, D.C.) - A Washington, D.C., couple is accused of spying for the Cuban government for more than 30 years, but the husband and wife deny the claims. Michael Greenberger, JD, a professor at the School of Law and the director of the Center for Health and Homeland Security, is quoted.

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500 W. Baltimore Street, Baltimore, MD 21201-1786 PHONE: (410) 706-7214 FAX: (410) 706-4045 / TDD: (410) 706-7714

Copyright © 2014, University of Maryland Francis King Carey School of Law. All Rights Reserved