Faculty in the News - Archive



Tuesday, August 4, 2009

Professor Michael Greenberger

Global Research - A report by the Government Accountability Office recommended that derivatives be tightly regulated and in 1998, the head of the Commodity Futures Trading Commission, a woman named Brooksley Born, agreed. More regulation wasn't exactly what Goldman had in mind. "The banks go crazy they want it stopped," says Michael Greenberger, JD, who worked for Born as director of trading and markets at the CFTC and is now a professor at the University of Maryland School of Law. Read more

Monday, August 3, 2009

Adjunct Professor Andrew Baida

The Daily Record - Andrew Baida, JD, an adjunct professor of appellate advocacy at the University of Maryland School of Law, wrote in a column that: "Just because a decision isn't stamped with the word 'Reported' on the cover page does not mean that it should be kept out of the public domain." Read more

Sunday, August 2, 2009

Jacob A. France Professor Michael Millemann & Assistant Professor Renee Hutchins

The Baltimore Sun - However you feel about putting juveniles in prison, the matter of Mark Farley Grant demands attention because it is likely he did not commit the crime for which he has been so profoundly penalized. In fact, students at the University of Maryland School of Law and their professors are convinced of it. The students of two professors, Renee Hutchins, JD, and Michael Millemann, JD, took two years to research Mr. Grant's case before deciding to take it on. Read more

Friday, July 31, 2009

Professor Michael Greenberger

American Banker, Financial-Planning.com - Two House committee chairman said they were close to a final agreement on a bill that would significantly curb trading of credit-default swaps and provide strong incentives for banks to bring contracts on to regulated exchanges. Michael Greenberger, JD, a professor at the School of Law and a former director at the U.S. Commodity Futures Trading Commission, is quoted.

Thursday, July 30, 2009

Professor Richard Boldt

The Washington Post - More than 2,300 Maryland inmates were serving life sentences last year, nearly 10 percent of the prison population, according to an advocacy group report released this month. Nearly 77 percent of inmates in prison for life in Maryland are African American, making it the state with the largest share of black prisoners serving life sentences. Among the 269 prisoners in Maryland sentenced to life for crimes committed when they were juveniles, 226 are black. Richard Boldt, JD, a professor at the School of Law, is quoted.

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500 W. Baltimore Street, Baltimore, MD 21201-1786 PHONE: (410) 706-7214 FAX: (410) 706-4045 / TDD: (410) 706-7714

Copyright © 2014, University of Maryland Francis King Carey School of Law. All Rights Reserved