Faculty in the News - Archive



Tuesday, February 5, 2008

Professor Jane F. Barrett

The Baltimore Sun, The Annapolis Capital The Delmarva Daily Times – An environmental group sued the state yesterday for failing to allow public access to records showing how chicken farmers handle more than a billion pounds of manure a year. While all farmers are required to have the management plans, the Waterkeeper Alliance is seeking access only to information about poultry operations. Jane Barrett, JD, associate professor at the School of Law and director of its Environmental Law Clinic, which filed the lawsuit in Anne Arundel Circuit Court on behalf of the Waterkeeper group, said the state should at least release the plans with the names blacked out. "Or, the state should consider the secrecy provision to be nullified by an older and more sweeping law, the Maryland Public Information Act, which requires most information maintained by state agencies to be open to public scrutiny," she said.

Monday, February 4, 2008

Professor Michael Greenberger

Amednews.com – Efforts to prepare for a pandemic or other type of mass disease event belong squarely in the realm of public health and not law enforcement, contrary to the direction taken since Sept. 11 by the federal government, argues a new report by the American Civil Liberties Union. More funds need to be provided to public health, said Michael Greenberger, JD, professor at the School of Law and director of the Center for Health and Homeland Security, who spoke during a panel discussion following the report’s release. And when federal plans require each household to stockpile supplies and medications, they aren’t taking the elderly, disabled, and poor into account, Greenberger said.

Monday, February 4, 2008

Professor Michael Greenberger

Associated Press (Published in 93 newspapers and 127 Web sites) - Working from transcripts of the U.S. military tribunals at Guantanamo Bay, Sig Libowitz crafted a 30-minute screenplay. The Response imagines one such tribunal, then follows three military judges into the deliberation room, where they try to answer the key question about Guantanamo: How do you balance civil liberties and national security? That debate was enough to lure three well-known actors Kate Mulgrew, Aasif Mandvi, and Peter Riegert to join Libowitz in a mock courtroom at the School of Law, where The Response was shot over three days. "This is really something that takes a look at what’s going on there from a very fair-minded perspective," said Libowitz, who graduated from the School in 2007. Michael Greenberger, JD, a professor at the School, director of its Center for Health and Homeland Security, and former Justice Department counter-terrorism official who consulted with Libowitz on the script, said "Guantanamo has inspired debate about the constitutional guarantee of habeas corpus the right of individuals being detained to challenge their detention before a judge." The film was funded by the School’s Linking Law and the Arts Series, which attempts to address complex legal issues through theater and art. Karen H. Rothenberg, JD, MPA, dean of the School, envisions it as an educational tool to be shown at other law schools, colleges, and high schools. But she and Libowitz also plan to shop it around to film festivals and seek television distribution.

Monday, February 4, 2008

Dean Karen Rothenberg

Associated Press (Published in 93 newspapers and 127 Web sites) - Working from transcripts of the U.S. military tribunals at Guantanamo Bay, Sig Libowitz crafted a 30-minute screenplay. The Response imagines one such tribunal, then follows three military judges into the deliberation room, where they try to answer the key question about Guantanamo: How do you balance civil liberties and national security? That debate was enough to lure three well-known actors Kate Mulgrew, Aasif Mandvi, and Peter Riegert to join Libowitz in a mock courtroom at the School of Law, where The Response was shot over three days. "This is really something that takes a look at what’s going on there from a very fair-minded perspective," said Libowitz, who graduated from the School in 2007. Michael Greenberger, JD, a professor at the School, director of its Center for Health and Homeland Security, and former Justice Department counter-terrorism official who consulted with Libowitz on the script, said "Guantanamo has inspired debate about the constitutional guarantee of habeas corpus the right of individuals being detained to challenge their detention before a judge." The film was funded by the School’s Linking Law and the Arts Series, which attempts to address complex legal issues through theater and art. Karen H. Rothenberg, JD, MPA, dean of the School, envisions it as an educational tool to be shown at other law schools, colleges, and high schools. But she and Libowitz also plan to shop it around to film festivals and seek television distribution.

Saturday, February 2, 2008

Professor Sherrilyn Ifill

The Baltimore Sun – Columnist Gregory Kane reports on an event at the School of Law during which Sherrilyn Ifill, JD, a professor at the School, stood in front of the group assembled in the Moot Court there and gave a synopsis of what the film Banished is about. For six decades, black Americans were systemically driven from towns and cities across America. Not all of those towns were in the South. In Banished, filmmaker Marco Williams visited Pierce City, Mo., Forsyth County, Ga., and Harrison, Ark. He talked to blacks and whites about how blacks were driven from those places, and what the chances are for reconciliation today. "It’s an important phenomenon," Ifill said of what has been called the "racial cleansing" of blacks from communities that have remained virtually lily-white, even in the 21st century. "Important in how we see the geographical landscape today."

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