Faculty in the News - Archive



Wednesday, February 13, 2008

Professor Michael Greenberger

WUSA-TV, Ch. 9 – Michael Greenberger, JD, professor at the School of Law and director of the Center for Health and Homeland Security, discussed why the Senate voted to re-authorize the Bush administration’s domestic surveillance program while granting immunity to major telecommunications companies that have taken part. He also talked about why, nearly 6 1/2 years after the Sept. 11 attacks, the U.S. is preparing to prosecute six of the men it says are responsible.

Tuesday, February 12, 2008

Professor Michael Millemann

Cumberland Times-News – Legal services for low-income clients and seniors in Allegany County will be expanded through a pilot project that offers representation in family law matters at reduced fees. Michael Millemann, JD, professor at the School of Law, conducted the study to review the potential of reinstating a program from the 1970s known as Judicare.

Monday, February 11, 2008

Adjunct Professor Andrew Baida

The Daily Record – Andrew Baida, JD, adjunct professor of appellate advocacy at the School of Law, writes a column about "a different kind of conflict that focuses on a weapon of mass destruction many of us first learned about in law school and now use in battling our adversaries in the fight to convince the appellate court to rule in our favor. That instrument of war is commonly known as IRAC, which stands for Issue, Rule, Application, and Conclusion."

Sunday, February 10, 2008

Professor Abraham Dash

The Washington Post, Washingtonpost.com – Jury selection begins Monday in the trial of a former Prince George's County police officer who shot two unarmed furniture delivery men in his home last year. In general, said Abraham Dash, JD, professor at the School of Law, it is difficult to persuade a jury to convict a police officer of a crime committed while the officer is carrying out his duties. But the circumstances in this case the shootings occurred at Keith Washington’s home, during a furniture delivery might mitigate the deference that jurors often give to officers. "I don’t know how much weight they will give to him being a police officer," Dash said. "I think they’ll go with the facts."

Saturday, February 9, 2008

Professor Robert Percival

The Washington Post, Washingtonpost.com – A federal appeals court has rejected the Environmental Protection Agency’s approach to limiting mercury emitted from power-plant smokestacks, saying the agency ignored laws and twisted logic when it imposed new standards that were favorable to plant owners. Whatever the environmental impact, Robert Percival, JD, MA, professor at the School of Law and director of the Environmental Law Program, saw a clear legal signal in the decision. He said the judges showed surprising pique at the Bush administration. "It’s fairly clear that even judges that are, you know, not that fond of environmental regulation are kind of appalled at how willing the [administration] has been to try to bend the law," said Percival.

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Copyright © 2014, University of Maryland Francis King Carey School of Law. All Rights Reserved