Faculty in the News - Archive



Wednesday, February 20, 2008

Professor Douglas Colbert

The Baltimore Sun, The Baltimore Examiner Ė A group of Maryland Law School students is meeting resistance as it attempts to free people too poor to post small bails for minor charges, the groupís professor said. "Currently, too many people accused of less serious crimes remain incarcerated for 30 days and longer because they lack the necessary financial resources ... " Douglas Colbert, JD, a professor at the School of Law, wrote in a letter to the Baltimore City Criminal Justice Coordinating Council. With the councilís blessing, Colbert said he and his students asked prosecutors in December to review the bails of 3,500 nonviolent suspects awaiting trial to see if any bail was set too high for a minor offense.

Wednesday, February 20, 2008

Professor Michael Greenberger

WUSA-TV Ė Michael Greenberger, JD, a professor at the School of Law and director of the Center for Health and Homeland Security, discussed the new security measures on Amtrak trains. Greenberger says that, "since 9/11, the biggest terrorist problems have been with trains" and that there is a "need to pick up security on mass transit." Greenberger says the random passenger security stops Amtrak officials plan to do will provide"minimum intrusion on traffic and have the maximum ability to protect the trains." In addition, Greenberger commented on the Supreme Courtís decision not to hear the American Civil Liberties Union domestic spying case, saying the decision was "no surprise."

Saturday, February 16, 2008

Adjunct Professor Andrew Levy

WJZ-TV, Ch. 13, WJZ.com Ė Maryland Congressman Elijah Cummings said he did not find the testimony of pitching great Roger Clemens to be credible when he told Congress that he never used steroids. If Clemens is convicted of lying under oath, he could face up to five years in prison. The likelihood Clemens will ever see the inside of a jail cell is slim, according to Andrew Levy, JD, adjunct professor at the School of Law. "Itís very hard to convict someone of perjury. There are a lot of technical requirements. In addition, you have to prove that they were lying. It can be hard to prove someone was lying, and you also have to prove they did it intentionally," said Levy.

Friday, February 15, 2008

Professor Michael Greenberger

Atlanta Journal-Constitution, AJC.com Ė More than a year ago, officials inside the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) discussed the potential long-term cancer risk posed by trailers housing thousands of Hurricane Katrina survivors, records show. But the Atlanta-based agency delayed an investigation of the threat of long-term exposure to formaldehyde until recently because CDC needed an official request before it could act. The CDCís view of its limited ability to take the initiative to protect the public drew surprise and criticism from some public health experts. "Itís just an indefensible position," said Michael Greenberger, JD, professor at the School of Law and director of the Center for Health and Homeland Security.

Friday, February 15, 2008

Adjunct Professor Louise Phipps Senft

The Daily Record, MDDailyRecord.com Ė "The Maryland Court of Appeals rules governing alternative dispute resolution and, more specifically, mediation, Title 17 dramatically changed the face of litigation for businesses and other entities," writes Louise Phipps Senft, JD, adjunct professor at the School of Law. "Adopted 10 years ago, the rules set forth the standards for mediation and shortly thereafter, Chief Judge [Robert] Bell put in motion an unprecedented request that all 24 circuit courts make mediation available for all civil matters."

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