Faculty in the News - Archive



Wednesday, March 26, 2008

Professor Robert Suggs

The Baltimore City Paper - One of the biggest complaints about American Society of Composers, Authors and Publishers (ASCAP) from those who use it is that, for an organization that behaves in a quasi-governmental manner, demanding licenses, leveling penalties (by way of the court system, at least), it has the transparency of the KGB. To many artists, ASCAP's royalty distribution scheme has little rhyme or reason beyond it being tilted in favor of known pop artists. As Robert Suggs, JD, a professor at the School of Law specializing in copyright law, observes, "Very, very few musicians make their living off their ASCAP royalties. If you are an independent artist, the odds of being on commercial radio tend toward zero," says Sugg. "Copyright is analyzed as an economic phenomena, [and] the health of copyright is based upon the gross revenues of the record labels, movie studios, etc."

Tuesday, March 25, 2008

Adjunct Professor Andrew Levy

WBFF-TV, Ch. 45 - For the first time, Marylandís viable fetus law is being used in the murder trial of David Miller in Baltimore County. The law allows prosecutors to charge Miller with the death of his girlfriend and of their unborn child. The girlfriend was seven months pregnant when she was shot and killed in a car last June at the Parkway Crossing Shopping Center. Andrew Levy, JD, an adjunct professor at the School of Law, was interviewed about the importance of the case.

Sunday, March 23, 2008

Professor Sherrilyn Ifill

The Baltimore Sun - Sherrilyn Ifill, JD, a professor at the School of Law, wrote in an Op-Ed, "More than anything else, Barack Obama's monumental speech on race last Tuesday was an invitation and a challenge to the American public to come out from behind the walls where we've taken cover, and to confront race and our differences head-on. Standing at his own unique and very personal crossroads, Sen. Obama exhorted Americans to look at one another, to listen, to hear one anotherís stories, and, for a brief moment, refrain from condemning one another."

Sunday, March 23, 2008

Professor Michael Greenberger

The New York Times - Washington has long followed the financial industryís lead in supporting deregulation, even as newly minted but little-understood products like derivatives proliferated. "During the late 1990s, Wall Street fought bitterly against any attempt to regulate the emerging derivatives market," recalls Michael Greenberger, JD, a professor at the School of Law and a former senior regulator at the Commodity Futures Trading Commission. Although the Long-Term Capital debacle in 1998 alerted regulators and bankers alike to the dangers of big bets with borrowed money, a rescue effort engineered by the Federal Reserve Bank of New York prevented the damage from spreading. "After that, all was forgotten," says Greenberger. "At the same time, derivatives were being praised as a boon that would make the economy more stable."

Friday, March 21, 2008

Adjunct Professor Louise Phipps Senft

The Daily Record - "People coming to mediation often have tried repeatedly to resolve their conflict or dispute without success. For them to be able to resolve it within the mediation room, some thing or things have to change. It may be how they had gone about addressing their conflict or not addressing their conflict; how they had negotiated or not negotiated; how they had dealt with emotional barriers or created emotional barriers; whether they had identified mutual goals or only their own goals; and so forth. Some change is necessary. The mediator, however, does not seek to change people, but rather fosters the opportunities or creates the environment where change can take place. And, with the assistance of the mediator, the parties do manage to make necessary changes," writes Louise Phipps Senft, JD, an adjunct professor at the School of Law and founder of the Baltimore Mediation Center.

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500 W. Baltimore Street, Baltimore, MD 21201-1786 PHONE: (410) 706-7214 FAX: (410) 706-4045 / TDD: (410) 706-7714

Copyright © 2014, University of Maryland Francis King Carey School of Law. All Rights Reserved