Faculty in the News - Archive



Monday, April 7, 2008

Professor Orde Kittrie

The Washington Post - Witnesses at Tuesday’s Senate hearing on finance on Iran sanctions will include Philip Gordon, a senior fellow for U.S. foreign policy at the Brookings Institution, and Orde Kittrie, JD, a visiting associate professor at the School of Law and a professor of law at Arizona State University.

Thursday, April 3, 2008

Professor Michael Greenberger

Portsmouth Herald, National Public Radio "Fresh Air" and "Diane Rehm Show", WUSA-TV, Ch. 9, The Guardian, Mediachannel.com, NY Times blog - U.S. Treasury Secretary Henry Paulson has proposed the broadest overhaul of the American system of financial regulation since the Great Depression in an effort to rebuild confidence in Wall Street’s battered institutions. Under the plan, the Federal Reserve would get extra powers to delve into the books of banks and brokerages if it suspected them of taking undue risks that could jeopardize the financial system. Michael Greenberger, JD, a professor at the School of Law and a former director of the Division of Trading and Markets at the Commodity Futures Trading Commission, said: "Overall, this system is designed to attack problems as they occur rather than to prevent problems."

Monday, March 31, 2008

Professor Michael Greenberger

The Guardian, Bloomberg TV news - The Bush administration is proposing the broadest overhaul of Wall Street regulation since the Great Depression. But the plan, to be unveiled on Monday, has its genesis in a yearlong effort to limit Washington’s role in the market. "Overall, this system is designed to attack problems as they occur rather than to prevent problems." said Michael Greenberger, JD, a professor at the School of Law who was a senior official of the Commodity Futures Trading Commission during the Clinton administration. "This is the equivalent of the builders of the Maginot line giving lessons on defense."

Sunday, March 30, 2008

Professor Michael Greenberger

The New York Times, Austin-American Statesman, Statesman.com - The Bush administration is proposing the broadest overhaul of Wall Street regulation since the Great Depression. But the plan, to be unveiled on Monday, has its genesis in a yearlong effort to limit Washington’s role in the market. "The Fed oversaw this meltdown," said Michael Greenberger, JD, a professor at the School of Law who was a senior official of the Commodity Futures Trading Commission during the Clinton administration. "This is the equivalent of the builders of the Maginot line giving lessons on defense."

Sunday, March 30, 2008

Professor Michael Greenberger

The New York Times - The Bush administration is proposing the broadest overhaul of Wall Street regulation since the Great Depression. But the plan, to be unveiled on Monday, has its genesis in a yearlong effort to limit Washington’s role in the market. The Fed would not be able to act simply because one bank or brokerage house was taking excessive risk. Instead, the Fed’s "authority to require correction actions should be limited to instances where overall financial market stability was threatened," the summary of the proposal states. One former regulator said the Fed’s previous actions did not argue for giving it more power. "The Fed oversaw this meltdown," said Michael Greenberger, JD, a professor at the School of Law, and a former top official with the Commodity Futures Trading Commission. "This is the equivalent of the builders of the Maginot Line giving lessons on defense."

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Copyright © 2014, University of Maryland Francis King Carey School of Law. All Rights Reserved