Faculty in the News - Archive



Monday, April 21, 2008

Professor Paula Monopoli

The Daily Record - Whereas 25 or 30 years ago, associates joined a firm for life, associates today feel freer to switch firms in pursuit of their financial, professional, and personal goals. "They are more inclined to kind of see themselves as free agents, so they are more comfortable asking for what they want from the firms," said School of Law Professor Paula Monopoli, JD.

Monday, April 21, 2008

Adjunct Professor Frank Razzano

Lawfuel.com Ė Pepper Hamilton LLP announced that Frank Razzano, JD, an adjunct professor at the School of Law and a trial lawyer with 36 years of experience representing clients in Securities and Exchange Commission enforcement, securities litigation, broker-dealer regulation, and white-collar criminal defense matters, has joined the firmís Commercial Litigation Practice Group as a partner in the Washington office.

Sunday, April 20, 2008

Dean Karen Rothenberg

The Washington Post, Austin American-Statesman - At its extreme, the prospect of getting an accurate handle on future dangerousness challenges the very notions of autonomy and free will that are at the core of any theory of criminal responsibility. "So far, judges have been cautious," said Karen H. Rothenberg, JD, MPA, dean of the School of Law. But given what Rothenberg calls the "love affair" that courts have had with DNA fingerprints, she and others fear that judges and juries will fall too quickly for the new tests. A survey led by Rothenberg and Diane Hoffmann, JD, MS, associate dean at the School, found that in 127 court cases that involved health-related DNA information, more than half had to do with medical malpractice, and most of those were birth-injury claims in which a parent blamed a doctor for a child's neurological or developmental problems.

Sunday, April 20, 2008

Associate Dean Diane Hoffmann

The Washington Post, Austin American-Statesman - At its extreme, the prospect of getting an accurate handle on future dangerousness challenges the very notions of autonomy and free will that are at the core of any theory of criminal responsibility. "So far, judges have been cautious," said Karen H. Rothenberg, JD, MPA, dean of the School of Law. But given what Rothenberg calls the "love affair" that courts have had with DNA fingerprints, she and others fear that judges and juries will fall too quickly for the new tests. A survey led by Rothenberg and Diane Hoffmann, JD, MS, associate dean at the School, found that in 127 court cases that involved health-related DNA information, more than half had to do with medical malpractice, and most of those were birth-injury claims in which a parent blamed a doctor for a child's neurological or developmental problems.

Sunday, April 20, 2008

Professor Orde Kittrie

The Baltimore Sun - In a city where leaders have for years tried and failed to curtail one of the nationís highest crime rates, a School of Law professor has turned his classroom into a crime-fighting think tank. Visiting Associate Professor Orde Kittrie, JD, is challenging his 13 students this semester to come up with workable ideas for making Baltimore and the rest of Maryland a safer place to live.

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500 W. Baltimore Street, Baltimore, MD 21201-1786 PHONE: (410) 706-7214 FAX: (410) 706-4045 / TDD: (410) 706-7714

Copyright © 2014, University of Maryland Francis King Carey School of Law. All Rights Reserved