Faculty in the News - Archive



Wednesday, May 28, 2008

Professor Kathleen Dachille

WBAL Radio "The Ron Smith Show" - Kathleen Dachille, JD, assistant professor at the School of Law and director of its Center for Tobacco Regulation, Litigation and Advocacy, spoke at a news conference held at City Hall on May 28 on the issue of banning small cigars, which tend to be flavored and geared toward young people, to prevent sales to teens and adolescents.

Wednesday, May 28, 2008

Professor Michael Greenberger

WUSA-TV, Ch. 9 - The U.S. Supreme Court ruled that workers can sue if they experience retaliation after claiming discrimination in the workplace. Michael Greenberger, JD, professor at the School of Law and a former director at the Commodity Futures Trading Commission, said the decision is important because two conservative judges surprisingly sided with four liberal judges, and "people who complain about discrimination often get retaliated against, the EEOC is overwhelmed with retaliation cases." Also, Greenberger will testify June 3 in front of the Senate Commerce Committee, where he will argue that speculators are driving up the cost of crude oil by trading futures on opaque markets. "Gas prices are at least 30 percent over what they would be if these markets were policed," Greenberger said.

Tuesday, May 27, 2008

Professor Michael Greenberger

C-SPAN's Washington Journal - As gas prices continue to rise at a record pace, there is a growing debate over where to place the blame. Oil executives told Congress last week that supply and demand accounts for most of consumers%FD pain at the pump, but Michael Greenberger, JD, professor at the School of Law and a former director at the Commodity Futures Trading Commission, said thatís not the case. Greenberger argues that 30 percent of the cost of each gallon of gas is the result of excessive speculation. "The markets are completely dysfunctional, out of control, being manipulated in an upward fashion so that the American consumer is paying for crude oil, heating oil, gasoline, propane gas, in a way that has no relation to supply and demand," said Greenberger. He will testify before Congress on this issue on June 3.

Friday, May 23, 2008

Professor Michael Greenberger

Fort Worth Star-Telegram - What you pay at the pump could be a direct result of energy speculation and price manipulation. Columnist Ed Wallace argues that the public has been misled by investors who deceitfully blame supply and demand. Wallace echoes Michael Greenberger, JD, a professor at the School of Law and a former director at the U.S. Commodity Futures Trading Commission, who has testified before Congress three times since 2006 on this issue. "Should we have an economy thatís based on whether people make good or bad bets? Or should we have an economy where people build companies, create manufacturing, do inventions, advance the American society, and make it more productive?"

Wednesday, May 21, 2008

Professor Michael Greenberger

WUSA-TV Ė An internal audit from the Justice Department found CIA and military interrogators ignored warnings from the FBI that contended their methods of questioning terror suspects were borderline torture. Agents observed abuses at military prisons in Afghanistan, Iraq and Guantanamo Bay. Michael Greenberger, JD, professor at the School of Law and director of the Center for Health and Homeland Security, said torture is not only against the law, itís counterproductive. "Carrying these tactics out in a way that borders on torture only leads people to say things that may not be true to stop the torture, or to stop the intensive interrogation techniques," says Greenberger. "It doesnít lead to good intelligence and it embarrasses and holds in low esteem the United States of America."

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