Faculty in the News - Archive



Friday, June 6, 2008

Professor Michael Greenberger

The Washington Post, Free Internet Press Hedge funds and big Wall Street banks are taking advantage of loopholes in federal trading limits to buy massive amounts of oil contracts, according to a growing number of lawmakers and prominent investors, who blame the practice for helping to push oil prices to record highs. Michael Greenberger, JD, a professor at the School of Law and former Commodity Futures Trading Commission (CFTC) director, said there were loopholes the agency could close without much effort. "There's smoke here, and the CFTC hasn't wanted to look if there's a fire," he said. "Now they say they want to look, but they need the data. . . . But these are dark markets. They don't even know who's doing the trading."

Wednesday, June 4, 2008

Professor Michael Greenberger

C-SPAN, SeekingAlpha.com, The Seattle Times, The Bellington Herald, The Austin American-Statesman, Cattlenetwork.com, Oil & Gas Journal, CleanSkies TV A group of experts told the Senate Commerce Committee yesterday that increased federal regulatory action of energy markets could be the catalyst for a drastic drop in oil prices. Michael Greenberger, JD, professor at the School of Law and a former director at the Commodity Futures Trading Commission, said that financial institutions like investment banks are manipulating oil prices through rampant futures trading on opaque markets. "I think there is a correlation between the weak dollar and excessive speculation," said Greenberger, who was a key witness at the hearing. "Turning this regulation over to Dubai and the English is a joke."

Tuesday, June 3, 2008

Professor Michael Greenberger

The Guardian, Land Line Magazine, Pensions & Investments, TheHill.com A group of experts told the Senate Commerce Committee yesterday that increased federal regulatory action of energy markets could be the catalyst for a drastic drop in oil prices. Michael Greenberger, JD, professor at the School of Law and a former director at the Commodity Futures Trading Commission, said that financial institutions like investment banks are manipulating oil prices through rampant futures trading on opaque markets. "I think there is a correlation between the weak dollar and excessive speculation," said Greenberger, who was a key witness at the hearing. "Turning this regulation over to Dubai and the English is a joke."

Sunday, June 1, 2008

Professor Michael Greenberger

African Energy News Review - Late last week, the U.S. Commodity Futures Trading Commission (CFTC) announced that it was investigating U.S. oil markets for possible price manipulation by investors, banks, and hedge funds. After the announcement, the crude prices took their steepest decline in 2 1/2 months. Michael Greenberger, JD, professor at the School of Law and a former director at the CFTC, said, "The traders now know that someone is looking over their shoulder. There will be a lot of administrative and criminal litigation before the sun sets on this." Greenberger will testify on this issue tomorrow before the Senate Committee on Commerce, Science, and Transportation.

Saturday, May 31, 2008

Professor Michael Greenberger

Bloomberg.com, WZBC-FM Boston Sounds of Dissent, CNN.com, KLIF-AM Dallas Wheels with Ed Wallace - Late last week, the U.S. Commodity Futures Trading Commission (CFTC) announced that it was investigating U.S. oil markets for possible price manipulation by investors, banks, and hedge funds. After the announcement, the crude prices took their steepest decline in 2 1/2 months. Michael Greenberger, JD, professor at the School of Law and a former director at the CFTC, said, "The traders now know that someone is looking over their shoulder. There will be a lot of administrative and criminal litigation before the sun sets on this." Greenberger will testify on this issue tomorrow before the Senate Committee on Commerce, Science, and Transportation.

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