Faculty in the News - Archive



Tuesday, July 1, 2008

Professor William Reynolds

The Daily Record – After skipping court dates last week in advance of a Baltimore judge’s $33.6 million verdict against him and his co-defendants in former Raven Michael McCrary’s fraud lawsuit, Edward V. Giannasca II appeared as ordered in the Clarence M. Mitchell Jr. Courthouse on Monday morning. As for why Giannasca’s past absences matter now that the judgment has been entered, a law professor unconnected to the case said it’s probably a matter of maintaining respect for the court’s instructions. "It might have something to do with the apportionment of damages among the parties, but it’s more that he ignored a judicial order," said William Reynolds, JD, Jacob A. France Professor of Judicial Process at the School of Law. "Judges don’t like that."

Tuesday, July 1, 2008

Professor Michael Greenberger

Philadelphia Daily News – Sen. John McCain’s campaign co-chair and economic advisor is former Texas Sen. Phil Gramm, the chief supporter of the Commodity Futures Modernization Act of 2000. That bill, once passed, shielded credit default swaps (CDS) from regulation, allowing banks to offer investors a form of off-the-radar insurance (in name only) for buying bank-created securities composed of a veritable zip file of subprime mortgages. Michael Greenberger, JD, professor at the School of Law and a former director of the Commodity Futures Trading Commission, said unregulated CDS "have been at the heart of the subprime meltdown."

Monday, June 30, 2008

Professor Taunya Lovell Banks

WBAL-TV – In addition to calling the ethics probe against her racist and sexist, Mayor Sheila Dixon also blasted leaks in the case, speculating that the seed for the investigation was planted by someone at City Hall. School of Law Professor Taunya Banks, JD, agreed. "It undercuts public confidence in the legal system, in the courts. %85 Grand jury proceedings are secret. They're secret for a reason," Banks said. The leaks amount to a pretrial in the press, according to Banks a pretrial that could result in some big legal questions. "Assuming there is an indictment, this affects the case. The question is, has all this pretrial publicity tainted the jury pool?" Banks questioned.

Monday, June 30, 2008

Professor Rena Steinzor

AlterNet.org – Over the 71⁄2 years of the Bush administration, it's hard to name a major U.S. government regulatory agency that hasn't seen some type of scandal involving science. From the Environmental Protection Agency to the Bureau of Land Management to the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, we've heard repeated complaints from government scientists who say that their work on environmental issues has been inappropriately edited by political appointees, that they themselves have been muzzled, and that their agencies have put out rank misinformation to the public. Rena Steinzor, JD, a professor at the School of Law and president of the Center for Progressive Reform, notes, "The problem is not just that they put these panels together outside of FACA [Federal Advisory Committee Act], outside of that statutory protection." Additional issues arise when it comes to ensuring that advisory committees formed under FACA aren't rife with conflicts of interest. The law allows the granting of "waivers" that let potentially conflicted scientists serve anyway, and this has been widely abused. "The disclosures are late, never publicized, and conflicts are waived all the time," says Steinzor.

Monday, June 30, 2008

Professor Rena Steinzor

Military-Quotes.com blog, ThePumpHandle.com blog - The Pentagon and the Environmental Protection Agency are mired in a dispute over the pace of environmental clean-ups at Maryland's Fort Meade and Fort Detrick, where contamination from fuels and munitions for years seeped into soil and groundwater. "This is stunning," said Rena Steinzor, JD, a professor at the School of Law and president of the nonprofit Center for Progressive Reform, who helped write the Superfund laws as a congressional staffer. "The idea that they would refuse to sign a final order that is the height of amazing nerve."

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