Faculty in the News - Archive



Sunday, August 3, 2008

Professor Michael Greenberger

Austin American-Statesman, Statesman.com – Until the 2001 anthrax attacks, Bruce Ivins was one of just a few dozen U.S. bioterrorism researchers working with the most lethal pathogens, almost all at high-security military laboratories. Today, there are hundreds of such researchers in scores of laboratories at universities and other institutions around the United States, preparing for the next bioattack. Michael Greenberger, JD, a professor at the School of Law and director of the School’s Center for Health and Homeland Security, said the increased federal spending has better prepared the nation for a future bioterrorism attack, without creating significant vulnerabilities. "You can never say that the system is 100 percent secure," he said. "But the research ethic today is one of much greater discipline and focus on security than was true prior to the anthrax attacks."

Sunday, August 3, 2008

Professor Michael Greenberger

The New York Times – Until the 2001 anthrax attacks, Bruce Ivins was one of just a few dozen U.S. bioterrorism researchers working with the most lethal pathogens, almost all at high-security military laboratories. Today, there are hundreds of such researchers in scores of laboratories at universities and other institutions around the United States, preparing for the next bioattack. Michael Greenberger, JD, a professor at the School of Law and director of the School’s Center for Health and Homeland Security, said the increased federal spending has better prepared the nation for a future bioterrorism attack, without creating significant vulnerabilities. "You can never say that the system is 100 percent secure," he said. "But the research ethic today is one of much greater discipline and focus on security than was true prior to the anthrax attacks."

Sunday, August 3, 2008

Professor Michael Greenberger

Background Briefing, ABC Radio National, Australia – With billions of people in Asia boosting the world demand for commodities like food and energy, prices have continued on a steep upward trend. But some experts say that supply-demand fundamentals are only one piece of the puzzle, and that speculators without a commercial interest in the underlying commodities should shoulder some of the blame. Michael Greenberger, JD, professor at the School of Law and a former director at the Commodity Futures Trading Commission, said, "I’m all for futures markets, I think they’re very important. But basically they’re not gambling casinos. They’re to be used by people in the industry to hedge their risk and therefore give consumers a lower price."

Friday, August 1, 2008

Professor Robert Rhee

Exhibit A – Summertime is not all hammocks and lemonade. The savvy homeowner knows that heat creates a climate for legal hassles. Dog bite injuries are most common during summer months, with children most at risk. "The homeowner should be aware of any vicious qualities of a dog, because the homeowner is going to be liable," says Associate Professor Robert Rhee, JD, MBA, of the School of Law. Fear of lawsuits shouldn’t ruin your summer, though. "Most claims for small amounts will probably be settled by the parties themselves," Rhee says.

Wednesday, July 30, 2008

Professor Michael Greenberger

WUSA-TV, Ch. 9 – Alaska Sen. Ted Stevens, the longest serving Republican senator ever, was charged on Tuesday with concealing $250,000 worth of gifts he allegedly received from an Alaska oil services company. Michael Greenberger, JD, professor at the School of Law and a former U.S. Justice Department official, said, "I think it’s a shock to hear that somebody of that stature is under indictment, but certainly if you followed the news it can’t be labeled a surprise."

Go to page: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 34 35 36 37 38 39 40 41 42 43 44 45 46 47 48 49 50 51 52 53 54 55 56 57 58 59 60 61 62 63 64 65 66 67 68 69 70 71 72 73 74 75 76 77


Back To Top

UM Shuttle UM | About This Site | Site Map | Contact Us


500 W. Baltimore Street, Baltimore, MD 21201-1786 PHONE: (410) 706-7214 FAX: (410) 706-4045 / TDD: (410) 706-7714
Copyright © 2014, University of Maryland Francis King Carey School of Law. All Rights Reserved.

Hotline Hotline



UM | About This Site | Site Map | Contact Us


500 W. Baltimore Street, Baltimore, MD 21201-1786 PHONE: (410) 706-7214 FAX: (410) 706-4045 / TDD: (410) 706-7714

Copyright © 2014, University of Maryland Francis King Carey School of Law. All Rights Reserved