Faculty in the News - Archive



Friday, August 8, 2008

Professor Michael Greenberger

The Baltimore Sun, RedOrbit.com – Federal authorities released a plethora of circumstantial evidence in the wake of the suicide of Bruce Ivins, the man alleged to be responsible for the 2001 anthrax killings. Now legal experts say Ivins’ guilt would have been tough to prove based on a dearth of direct evidence. "There is a classic defense mechanism to raise reasonable doubt by presenting the jury with viable options as to how the crime was perpetrated," said Michael Greenberger, JD, professor at the School of Law and director of its Center for Health and Homeland Security. "This case would have been a very, very difficult case to prove," Greenberger said.

Thursday, August 7, 2008

Professor Michael Greenberger

USA Today, WUSA-TV, Ch. 9 – Federal prosecutors say that evidence released in court documents Wednesday proves that Bruce Ivins was responsible for anthrax attacks in September and October of 2001. Michael Greenberger, JD, professor at the School of Law and director of its Center for Health and Homeland Security, said, "If they're saying, ‘We found the guy, and this is it,’ to me this falls short of that mark." Greenberger added: "There's a lot of circumstantial evidence that certainly supports probable cause, but I have questions [about] whether this proves anything beyond a reasonable doubt."

Thursday, August 7, 2008

Professor Michael Greenberger

Detroit Free Press – Michael Greenberger, JD, a professor at the School of Law and a former director of the Division of Trading and Markets at the Commodity Futures Trading Commission, said regulators suffer from a lack of market data thanks to the deregulation of commodities markets at the start of the decade. However, he added, "Speculators are playing a role. I fear it is a significant amount of speculation."

Thursday, August 7, 2008

Professor Michael Greenberger

Marin Independent Journal – Shares of Redwood Trust, a company that buys residential mortgages and packages them as investment securities, fell to a 52-week low this week after reporting a $46 million loss. Redwood’s CEO said that his company’s balance sheet has long been misrepresented by generally accepted accounting principles (GAAP), which he said require Redwood to overstate its exposure to debt. Michael Greenberger, JD, professor at the School of Law and a former director at the Commodity Futures Trading Commission, said "GAAP if anything would be overly optimistic about the value of things, not under optimistic. People are criticizing GAAP for not properly reflecting the true value of these instruments."

Thursday, August 7, 2008

Professor Michael Greenberger

MSN Money – Columnist Andrew Horowitz argues that the U.S. economy is in the midst of a general slowdown, thus he is entering into investment positions that "have a good chance of not getting obliterated" by ills in the current market. Horowitz credits Michael Greenbeger, JD, professor at the School of Law and a former director at the Commodity Futures Trading Commission, for fully explaining the detrimental economic effects of the Enron loophole in a recent podcast.

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Copyright © 2014, University of Maryland Francis King Carey School of Law. All Rights Reserved