Faculty in the News - Archive



Thursday, October 9, 2008

Professor Michael Greenberger

"Lou Dobbs Tonight," CNN – Treasury Secretary Henry Paulson announced that his agency is considering infusing some of the $700 billion rescue money into troubled U.S. banks, which means the government could be a shareholder in financial institutions of all sizes. Michael Greenberger, JD, a professor at the School of Law and a former director at the Commodity Futures Trading Commission, said, "It’s very, very important that the treasury get a very quick start on this and at least appear to be on top of it and starting to get the money moving out."

Thursday, October 9, 2008

Professor Michael Greenberger

Propublica – It’s almost become conventional wisdom: today’s economic mess can be traced back, at least in part, to the front door of derivatives, the financial institutions that exploited them, and the government officials who fought to keep derivatives unregulated. Those officials include elected and appointed Democrats and Republicans in Washington, so Propublica argues that partisan finger-pointing is hypocritical. Michael Greenberger, JD, a professor at the School of Law, was one of only a handful of people who advocated for derivatives regulation when he was a director at the Commodity Futures Trading Commission (CFTC) in the late 90s; Brooksley Born, the CFTC’s top official at the time, led the regulation charge in Washington. "The [derivatives] market had grown and there had been a number of problems," he said.

Wednesday, October 8, 2008

Professor Michael Greenberger

The New York Times, CBonds.info, Finfacts.ie – Alan Greenspan, chairman of the Federal Reserve from 1987 to 2006, waged a perpetual war during his tenure to block governmental efforts to regulate derivatives. Those derivatives are at the heart of today’s financial crisis, playing a major role in the collapse of Bear Stearns, Lehman Brothers, and AIG. Michael Greenberger, JD, a professor at the School of Law, advocated for derivatives regulation when he was a director at the Commodity Futures Trading Commission (CFTC) in the late 90s; Brooksley Born, the CFTC’s top official at the time, led the regulation charge in Washington. But Greenspan dismissed the calls for action, arguing Wall Street would utilize derivatives responsibly. "Greenspan told Brooksley that she essentially didn’t know what she was doing and she’d cause a financial crisis," said Greenberger. "Brooksley was this woman who was not playing tennis with these guys and not having lunch with these guys. There was a little bit of the feeling that this woman was not of Wall Street."

Wednesday, October 8, 2008

Professor Michael Greenberger

WUSA TV, Ch. 9 (Washington, D.C.) – The Federal Reserve cut the federal funds rate by a half a percentage point in an effort to unfreeze credit markets and encourage lending, a move that could under normal circumstances spark a buying rally and reverse a markets negative trend. Michael Greenberger, JD, a professor at the School of Law and a former director at the Commodity Futures Trading Commission, said, "What’s happening essentially is we’re turning into an economy that doesn’t have borrowing so everything is cash, and what that’s going to do is deflate prices and deflate the economy very significantly."

Tuesday, October 7, 2008

Dean Karen Rothenberg

BroadwayWorld.com – On Thursday, Oct. 2, the Hippodrome Foundation sponsored a free symposium prior to the evening’s performance of "Legally Blonde" entitled "Challenges Facing Women in the Field of Law" featuring five distinguished woman attorneys, including Karen H. Rothenberg, JD, MPA, dean of the School of Law. During the discussion, Rothenberg admitted being a frustrated musical comedy actress.

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Copyright © 2014, University of Maryland Francis King Carey School of Law. All Rights Reserved