Faculty in the News - Archive



Monday, October 13, 2008

Adjunct Professor Stacy LeBow Siegel

Exhibit A – Inside Baltimore-area courthouses, judges and lawyers say many do-it-yourselfers are making a hash of things. Too often, they unknowingly violate the rules of pretrial processes and cause delays. Trials have to be rescheduled when neophytes lack the necessary evidence. "A lot of these people don’t know what the devil is going on," says retired Baltimore County Circuit Judge John Fader, JD, senior judicial fellow and lecturer at the School of Law. "Pro se’s don’t know how," says Towson attorney Stacy LeBow Siegel, JD/MBA, a family law expert and adjunct professor at the School of Law. "Having to do things over again increases fees for your client."

Sunday, October 12, 2008

Professor Stacy LeBow Siegel

The Baltimore Sun – As the case title immediately tells you, Larissa S. v. Melissa B. is unique: As a same-sex couple, they couldn't have married, so they couldn't divorce, either. But that also means their quarrel over visitation rights is breaking new legal ground in Maryland. The battle headed to court, and last week, Judge Lawrence R. Daniels ruled that Larissa had been involved in "all aspects of parenting" the now-7-year-old boy and has the right to visit him. "It's a very difficult burden," said attorney Stacy LeBow Siegel, JD, MBA, a visiting professor at the School of Law and a co-author of the family law textbook used there. "I am so thrilled," Siegel said of Larissa's victory. "I am so impressed with Judge Daniels' analysis and findings."

Friday, October 10, 2008

Professor Michael Greenberger

"CBS Evening News," 7 p.m. – Collateral damage from the Wall Street’s financial mess has caused turmoil on the trading floor, but the now-frozen credit markets could deal a more damaging blow to economies worldwide. Credit markets derive from loans large banks make to each other so those banks can lend to smaller institutions, but in the past month the interest rates they charge each other have doubled. Michael Greenberger, JD, a professor at the School of Law and a former director at the Commodity Futures Trading Commission, said, "Right now hoarding cash is the game that’s being played %85 cash is king, and I’m not going to give up my cash and give it to you and find out that your coins and your stamp collection are valueless and you’ll never pay me back."

Thursday, October 9, 2008

Professor Michael Greenberger

Arizona Republic – The repeal of the Glass-Steagall Act in 1999 opened the door for banks to invest in mortgage-backed securities and complex derivative instruments, which some experts say are largely to blame for today’s financial crisis. Michael Greenberger, JD, a professor at the School of Law and a former director at the Commodity Futures Trading Commission, said, "The theory was that the bankers were very smart and they weren't going to take excessive risks."

Thursday, October 9, 2008

Professor Michael Greenberger

The Gazette – Did the government’s failure to regulate arcane financial derivates pave the way for the subprime meltdown and, in turn, fuel today’s crisis on Wall Street? According to a panel of prominent experts at last week’s business law forum at the School of Law, that unregulated environment was a breeding ground for the balance sheet turmoil that’s led to epic bank collapses and record foreclosure rates. Michael Greenberger, JD, a professor at the School of Law and a former director at the Commodity Futures Trading Commission, co-moderated the forum.

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500 W. Baltimore Street, Baltimore, MD 21201-1786 PHONE: (410) 706-7214 FAX: (410) 706-4045 / TDD: (410) 706-7714

Copyright © 2014, University of Maryland Francis King Carey School of Law. All Rights Reserved