Faculty in the News - Archive



Wednesday, October 29, 2008

Professor Michael Greenberger

WUSA-TV, Ch. 9 – The Federal Reserve cut an overnight lending rate from 1.5 percent to 1 percent in a move geared toward encouraging banks to resume lending in a financial environment where credit is virtually nonexistent. Michael Greenberger, JD, a professor at the School of Law and a former director at the Commodity Futures Trading Commission, said, "The interest rates that are being charged, for example, between banks to loan money from one bank to another, has not dropped in proportion to the drop of the prime rate or the fed funds rate, and that’s because in this economy nobody really trusts anybody else."

Tuesday, October 28, 2008

Adjunct Professor Andrew Levy

The Baltimore Sun – At court hearing after court hearing, Nicholas Browning has sat stoically as lawyers argued about his bail status, the doctors who would evaluate him, and whether he would be tried in adult court or the juvenile system on charges that he killed his family. Nevertheless, attorneys said, a paroleable sentence remains a more appealing option for defendants despite the fact that no convicted killer serving life has been released on parole in Maryland since 1994, according to state officials. "Having a sentence that admits the possibility of parole even if it’s far into the future is preferable to one in which your only possibility of getting out is feet-first," said Andrew Levy, JD, an adjunct instructor at the School of Law and a trial lawyer.

Monday, October 27, 2008

Professor Abraham Dash

Times of the Internet (a UPI story) – Abraham Dash, JD, a professor emeritus at the School of Law, said the defense team for Nicholas Browning, the Cockeysville teen charged with killing his family, will likely argue that Browning's youth prevented him from understanding the rights he waived to remain silent and to speak to a lawyer. Dash said that Browning’s age, combined with the hours he spent in police custody before confessing to the shootings, should render his statements unconstitutionally involuntary. "I suspect they'll argue that even though he did not ask for a lawyer, he was so young that he didn’t quite understand what it meant that they could have a lawyer appointed for him," Dash said.

Friday, October 17, 2008

Professor Sherrilyn Ifill

NPR – Many political observers said this week’s presidential debate was Sen. John McCain's last chance to change the trajectory of the race. Did he succeed? Farai Chideya continued NPR’s post-debate analysis with Sherrilyn Ifill, JD a professor at the School of Law and a civil rights lawyer and Ron Christie, president of Christie Strategies and former special assistant to President George W. Bush.

Wednesday, October 15, 2008

Professor Michael Greenberger

The Washington Post, FreeInternetPress.com – From 1998-99, the top regulator at the Commodity Futures Trading Commission (CFTC) pushed for oversight and transparency of the derivatives markets, a campaign that was scuttled by the federal government’s chief financial advisors. Now experts blame derivatives for exacerbating today’s financial crisis, and some former naysayers concede that stonewalling regulation was a disastrous mistake. Michael Greenberger, JD, a professor at the School of Law who as a director at the CFTC when that agency was calling for derivatives regulation, said, "We knew it was a big deal [to attempt regulation] but the feeling was that something needed to be done." Greenberger added, "The industry had been fighting regulation for years, and in the meantime, you saw them accumulate a huge amount of stuff and it was already causing dislocations in the economy. The government was being kept blind to it."

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