Faculty in the News - Archive



Tuesday, January 9, 2007

Professor Michael Greenberger

CNN, "The Situation Room" – House Democrats are working to implement reforms from the 9/11 Commission during their first 100 hours. Ironically, the Democrats’ bill to implement key Sept. 11 recommendations ignores the recommendation that Congress reform itself. The current organizational chart shows a jumble of committees with some jurisdiction over homeland security. Last year, officials from the Department of Homeland Security attended 206 hearings and 2,000 briefings. Michael Greenberger, JD, director of the Center for Health and Homeland Security and a professor in the School of Law, said, "I don’t underestimate the amount of time taken away from the real job of the executive branch, which is to protect the country, by having to respond to duplicative hearings."

Saturday, January 6, 2007

Adjunct Professor Judge Joseph Murphy

The Baltimore Sun – Maryland’s Constitution requires Martin O’Malley, once he is sworn in as governor, to live in Annapolis. But the law also demands that District Court judges, including Catherine Curran O’Malley of the Baltimore bench, reside where they work. Legal experts say that in the past the courts have broadly interpreted the residency restriction that affects the state’s next first lady, looking at a number of factors such as where a person sleeps overnight and votes. "I think as long as [Catherine O’Malley] wants to continue to serve as a judge, she can," said Joseph Murphy Jr., JD, adjunct professor at the School of Law and chief judge of the Maryland Court of Special Appeals. "And the only way that she would not be able to is if she at some point says she no longer intends to return to Baltimore. ... You keep your domicile until you intend to change it."

Friday, January 5, 2007

The Maryland Katrina and Indigent Defense Project

WYPR-FM – On Sunday, 50 students from the School of Law, who formed the Maryland Katrina and Indigent Defense Project, will travel to Louisiana for a week to aid in the ongoing process of rebuilding New Orleans and its legal system. "There is a lot of hope now for people who have been lost and forgotten," said Douglas Colbert, JD, professor at the School and leader of the trip. "The justice system failed the citizens of New Orleans and, being a person of color from Baltimore, this struck a chord," said third-year student Shakeya Currie. Second-year student Brigid Ryan, who spent last summer working at the public defender's office in New Orleans, is helping lead the return trip. "Many of the people I saw had been incarcerated for minor offenses, such as failing to pay a parking fine or loitering," she said. The public service project caught the attention of first-year student Nina Wu, who said, "One of the most difficult things will be to establish trust." Michael Stallings, a third-year student, said he joined the project to help some of New Orleans’ most vulnerable. "In a lot of cases, I think we’ll be able to show people how they can help themselves," he said.

Thursday, January 4, 2007

The Maryland Katrina and Indigent Defense Project

The Baltimore Sun, The Baltimore Examiner, "Morning Edition," National Public Radio - On Sunday, 50 students from the School of Law, who formed the Maryland Katrina and Indigent Defense Project, will travel to Louisiana for a week to aid in the ongoing process of rebuilding New Orleans and its legal system. "There is a lot of hope now for people who have been lost and forgotten," said Douglas Colbert, JD, professor at the School and leader of the trip. "The justice system failed the citizens of New Orleans and, being a person of color from Baltimore, this struck a chord," said third-year student Shakeya Currie. Second-year student Brigid Ryan, who spent last summer working at the public defender's office in New Orleans, is helping lead the return trip. "Many of the people I saw had been incarcerated for minor offenses, such as failing to pay a parking fine or loitering," she said. The public service project caught the attention of first-year student Nina Wu, who said, "One of the most difficult things will be to establish trust." Michael Stallings, a third-year student, said he joined the project to help some of New Orleans’ most vulnerable. "In a lot of cases, I think we’ll be able to show people how they can help themselves," he said.

Wednesday, January 3, 2007

Professor Michael Greenberger

WUSA-TV – Michael Greenberger, JD, director of the Center for Health and Homeland Security and a professor in the School of Law, discussed reports about President Bush’s plan for Iraq, as well as whether or not the new Congress, led by democrats, will fund a continuing war in Iraq.

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500 W. Baltimore Street, Baltimore, MD 21201-1786 PHONE: (410) 706-7214 FAX: (410) 706-4045 / TDD: (410) 706-7714

Copyright © 2014, University of Maryland Francis King Carey School of Law. All Rights Reserved