Faculty in the News - Archive



Friday, January 19, 2007

Assistant Professor Kathleen Dachille

The New York Times – The city of Bangor, Maine has banned smoking in cars if children are present. The ordinance allows the police to stop cars if an adult is smoking while a child under 18 is a passenger, and the smoker can be fined $50. "I think because we have so affirmatively dealt with public places being smoke-free, it has simply made people think about places that are less public,'" said Kathleen Dachille, JD, assistant professor at the School of Law and director of the Legal Resource Center for Tobacco Regulation, Litigation, and Advocacy. "If a worker in a bar is entitled to protection from secondhand smoke, how can we ignore what is happening to children?"

Friday, January 19, 2007

Dean Karen Rothenberg

The Gazette – State researchers have submitted 85 proposals seeking a total of $81 million in grants but the stem cell commission has only $15 million, minus expenses, to award. Furthermore, commissioners are still grappling with how to pick winners and losers, while avoiding any conflict of interest, perceived or real. Commissioner Karen H. Rothenberg, JD, MPA, dean at the School of Law, favors allowing all commissioners to discuss every proposal. ‘‘When they put on three bioethicists, they really didn’t think we would have any conflicts," Rothenberg said.

Thursday, January 18, 2007

Professor David Super

The Baltimore Sun – Maryland’s first-in-the-nation law to compel Wal-Mart to spend more on employee health care suffered another setback yesterday, when the U.S. Court of Appeals for the 4th Circuit upheld a lower court finding that struck down Maryland’s legislation. "If you take their interpretation, there is very little states can do," said David Super, JD, professor at the School of Law.

Thursday, January 18, 2007

Dean Karen Rothenberg

The Daily Record – With proposals in hand for $80.8 million in scientific research, the Maryland Stem Cell Fund commissioners still are grappling with basic issues such as issues of conflict of interest. Commissioners at the group’s latest meeting on Tuesday reviewed basic information about 85 applications the commission received from scientists jockeying for a slice of the fund’s $15 million allocation. More than half the proposals were for projects involving embryonic stem cells, the more controversial type of research that often relies on embryos cast off from in vitro fertilization attempts. Members decided against approving the rules for the commission as a whole. Instead, they focused on one element of the rules that seemed to indicate anyone with any connection to the applicant in question including those with appointments at the Johns Hopkins University or the University of Maryland would have to recuse themselves from discussion of those applicants. Karen H. Rothenberg, JD, MPA, is a commission member and dean of the School of Law.

Wednesday, January 17, 2007

Dean Karen Rothenberg

The Baltimore Sun – The Maryland Stem Cell Commission has received research applications totaling nearly $81 million, more than five times the amount of money the state has to spend. "This is amazing," said Karen H. Rothenberg, JD, MPA, a commission member and dean of the School of Law.

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Copyright © 2014, University of Maryland Francis King Carey School of Law. All Rights Reserved