Faculty in the News - Archive



Sunday, February 4, 2007

Professor Susan Leviton

The Baltimore Sun – Baltimore police detectives say 7-year-old Garnell Moore, who hasn’t been seen in at least four years, is the one person who has completely vanished. "How can we have a society that doesn’t know where a kid is for four years?" asks Susan Leviton, JD, professor at the School of Law. "To think that a kid could spend all those years with no one knowing he’s not going to school it’s just so sad. It’s like a kid with no one."

Friday, February 2, 2007

Professor Sherrilyn Ifill

The Daily Record – "I have been amazed to discover how often and how pervasively racial violence figures into the history of small towns and cities throughout the United States," Sherrilyn Ifill, JD, associate professor at the School of Law, writes in the introduction of her new book, On the Courthouse Lawn: Confronting the Legacy of Lynching in the Twenty-First Century. The book not only discusses lynchings on Maryland’s Eastern Shore but also offers South Africa’s Truth and Reconciliation Commission, with its emphasis on restorative justice, as a way to finally bring all the stories of the shore’s painful past to the light to facilitate healing for individuals, communities, and organizations. Ifill’s colleague, Taunya Lovell Banks, JD, professor at the School, praised the book, and what it puts forward, as "groundbreaking."

Friday, February 2, 2007

Adjunct Professor Peter Holland

The Baltimore Sun – Despite admitting that he knew a traffic light wasn’t working when he drove his tractor-trailer through a Columbia intersection and slammed it into a car, killing two teens, Gary Dicks has been acquitted on a pair of traffic charges. Three civil cases are pending against Dicks in Howard County Circuit Court. Peter Holland, JD, adjunct professor at the School of Law, predicted Dicks’ acquittal will have no impact on the cases. "The burden of proof in a criminal case is higher than in a civil case, and the fact of an acquittal does not have an effect on a wrongful death of negligence lawsuit," he said.

Thursday, February 1, 2007

Professor Michael Greenberger

The New York Times – A jury in New York has decided that Ronell Wilson should die for shooting two police officers, making him the first person to face death in a federal case in New York since the 1950s. Michael Greenberger, JD, professor at the School of Law and director of the Center for Health and Homeland Security, noted that advances in DNA testing have uncovered faulty convictions and made juries nationally more hesitant to impose the death sentence. But he said there were no such doubts in the Wilson case. "This case is one that shocks the conscience," he said.

Thursday, February 1, 2007

Adjunct Professor Andrew Levy

The Baltimore Sun – For the first time, Maryland's highest court, the Court of Appeals, is being asked to rule when the search of a private body area need not be so private and whether a search that went inside a suspect's underwear was private enough. "I’ve never heard of a case like that," said Andrew Levy, JD, adjunct professor at the School of Law. "It’s a great question" that homes in on how much privacy is expected and what justifies an intrusion.

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500 W. Baltimore Street, Baltimore, MD 21201-1786 PHONE: (410) 706-7214 FAX: (410) 706-4045 / TDD: (410) 706-7714

Copyright © 2014, University of Maryland Francis King Carey School of Law. All Rights Reserved