Faculty in the News - Archive



Friday, February 9, 2007

Adjunct Professor Andrew Baida

The Daily Record – "A statement of facts offers a telling glimpse into what’s around the bend, and provides the writer with the very valuable opportunity to give the judges a good sense of what to expect later in the brief, namely, in the argument," writes Andrew Baida, JD, adjunct professor at the School of Law, in his op-ed "The Art of Appellate Advocacy."

Thursday, February 8, 2007

Professor Oscar Gray

The Daily Record – The House of Delegates’ Judiciary Committee is debating a bill that would switch the state’s liability system from contributory to comparative negligence. Opponents argued that many other states that have enacted a comparative standard have, at the same time, made other changes to tort law, such as eliminating joint and several liability. Oscar Gray, JD, the Jacob A. France Professor Emeritus of Torts at the School of Law, who testified for the bill, said eliminating joint and several liability is not a good option.

Wednesday, February 7, 2007

Professor Michael Greenberger

WUSA-TV – Michael Greenberger, JD, professor at the School of Law and director of the Center for Health and Homeland Security, discussed developments pertaining to the Lewis "Scooter" Libby trial, including his lawyers’ consideration of not putting Libby on the stand. He also commented on today’s expected testimony from NBC newsman Tim Russert, which will undercut Libby’s story that Russert was the individual who told him that former ambassador Joseph C. Wilson’s wife was a CIA operative who had sent Wilson to Niger.

Sunday, February 4, 2007

Dean Karen Rothenberg

The Baltimore Sun – Karen Rothenberg, JD, MPA, dean of the School of Law, recently testified in Washington before a House subcommittee considering a bill designed to protect workers from discrimination on the basis of genetic information, from employers and insurers. "As a matter of social policy, this issue is extremely important. What we are saying is that we should not allow discrimination because somebody gets genetic information that tells them that something in their genetic code says they have a predisposition to heart disease or cancer or whatever," she said.

Sunday, February 4, 2007

Dean Karen Rothenberg

The Minneapolis-St. Paul Star-Tribune – The shift in control of Congress has brightened prospects for approval of a law that would prevent employers or insurers from discriminating on the basis of genetic test results, according to legislators and other government officials. The fight is an early harbinger of the legal issues raised by the proliferation of genetic tests, now conducted by 610 laboratories for more than 1,350 diseases. "It is just one major public policy issue, and it might be the easiest" to address, said Karen Rothenberg, JD, MPA, dean of the School of Law, who recently testified in support of the measure before a House subcommittee.

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Copyright © 2014, University of Maryland Francis King Carey School of Law. All Rights Reserved