Faculty in the News - Archive



Friday, March 23, 2007

Adjunct Professor Judge Joseph Murphy

The Daily Record - Maryland Court of Special Appeals Judge James Kenney III turns 70 on Monday, which means he is required by Marylandís Constitution to leave the bench. He will, however, continue to sit as a specially assigned judge. Court of Special Appeals Chief Judge Joseph Murphy Jr., JD, adjunct professor at the School of Law, said itís hard to believe Kenney will be 70. "He has the energy and the intellect and the wonderful demeanor of an experienced lawyer whoís just hitting his stride," Murphy said.

Wednesday, March 21, 2007

Professor Michael Greenberger

WUSA-TV - Michael Greenberger, JD, director of the Center for Health and Homeland Security and a professor in the School of Law, discussed the firings of U.S. attorneys and the possible issuance of subpoenas by the House and Senate judiciary committees.

Wednesday, March 21, 2007

Professor Michael Greenberger

WUSA-TV - A new study from the University of Georgia says some of the largest U.S. cities, including Baltimore, are woefully unprepared for a nuclear attack and the widespread medical emergencies that would result. Michael Greenberger, JD, professor in the School of Law and director of the Center for Health and Homeland Security, said Baltimore and the rest of Maryland need more help from the federal government. "I really do believe the city and state are ahead of the curve on that, but the curve is on an uphill slant," said Greenberger.

Sunday, March 18, 2007

Adjunct Professor Gerald Winegrad

The Baltimore Sun Ė Roger Richardson, Marylandís new agriculture secretary, is a sixth-generation farmer and self-described conservative who has sometimes clashed with environmentalists. Gerald Winegrad, JD, adjunct professor at the School of Law and a former state senator, said state agriculture officials havenít done enough to regulate the industry. "After 20 years, agriculture hasnít come close to meeting its portion of the reduction in phosphorus, nitrogen, or sediment," Winegrad said. "Without very significant reductions by agriculture, youíll never restore the bay. Effectively, weíve had no enforcement, and that doesnít work."

Sunday, March 18, 2007

Professor Michael Greenberger

U.S. News & World Report Ė A project approved by Congress in 2004 to allocate $5.6 billion for inoculation against bioterrorism is getting off to a slow start. Michael Greenberger, JD, professor at the School of Law and director of the Center for Health and Homeland Security, says the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services has "put a virtual stranglehold" on Project Bioshield with delays, and few anti-bioterrorism pharmaceuticals have been purchased.

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Copyright © 2014, University of Maryland Francis King Carey School of Law. All Rights Reserved