Faculty in the News - Archive



Thursday, April 5, 2007

Professor Robert Suggs

The Daily Record (published in three newspapers) - The American Society of Composers, Authors and Publishers (ASCAP) has filed a lawsuit against the owners of the Starlight Diner and Club in Baltimore County seeking thousands in alleged unpaid royalties from a karaoke night last December. Robert Suggs, JD, professor at the School of Law, said the onus of paying for copyrighted material falls on the venue, not the performer. "If it’s a public performance and they’re performing copyrighted music, they’re within the Fairness in Musical Licensing Act, and they should have a license," Suggs said.

Thursday, April 5, 2007

Adjunct Professor Andrew Levy

WJZ-TV, Ch. 13 - Maryland’s two largest women’s advocacy groups are pushing for changes to the current state law to say that consensual sex can become rape if a woman says no at any time. Critics have said they are concerned that more false rape accusations will be reported if Maryland were to adopt the law. "I think what people’s concern is that there not be such a rigid rule, that as soon as consent is withdrawn, automatically a rape is deemed to have occurred," said Andrew Levy, JD, adjunct professor at the School of Law.

Wednesday, April 4, 2007

Adjunct Professor Andrew Levy

WJZ-TV, WJZ.com – Maryland’s two largest women’s advocacy groups are pushing for changes to the current state law to say that consensual sex can become rape if a woman says no at any time. Critics have said they are concerned that more false rape accusations will be reported if Maryland were to adopt the law. "I think what people’s concern is that there not be such a rigid rule, that as soon as consent is withdrawn, automatically a rape is deemed to have occurred," said Andrew Levy, JD, adjunct professor at the School of Law.

Wednesday, April 4, 2007

Professor Michael Greenberger

U.S. Federal News – Hedge funds, which are investment vehicles made up of lightly-regulated pools of money, grew by nearly one-third over the past year. Critics say these funds are so big that they can unfairly manipulate markets and want government to regulate them more closely. Supporters say hedge funds improve markets and warn that more regulation could hurt investors and slow innovation. Michael Greenberger, JD, professor at the School of Law and a former director of trading and markets for the Commodity Futures Trading Commission, said regulators, members of Congress, and others have been taking a close look at hedge funds. "There is beginning to be a concern about the impact of hedge funds on the economy and a movement toward doing something about that," Greenberger said.

Tuesday, April 3, 2007

Professor Michael Greenberger

The Christian Science Monitor (published in 18 newspapers and 23 Web sites) - Five and a half years after the terrorist attacks on Sept. 11, 2001, many people are rethinking, even challenging, the government’s expanded use of surveillance inside the U.S., spurred by revelations about the scope and number of new programs. One example is the FBI’s use of national security letters (NSL). After Sept. 11, the Patriot Act broadly expanded the use of NSLs, allowing the FBI to use them to obtain information on anyone American or not, suspect or not if the information could be relevant to an investigation on terrorism or espionage. "You have a system that’s badly broken, where the evidence isn’t being collected or used effectively," said Michael Greenberger, JD, professor at the School of Law and director of the Center for Health and Homeland Security.

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Copyright © 2014, University of Maryland Francis King Carey School of Law. All Rights Reserved