Faculty in the News - Archive



Tuesday, May 8, 2007

Professor Rena Steinzor

The Baltimore Sun – Mayor Sheila Dixon is forming a task force to investigate why Swann Park in South Baltimore remained open for 30 years despite studies showing high levels of arsenic in the soil there. Rena Steinzor, JD, professor at the School of Law and director of the Environmental Law Clinic, will be legal adviser. Said Steinzor, "There was a public health concern here, and of course people should have been paying attention to it."

Tuesday, May 8, 2007

Professor Michael Greenberger

WTOP-FM, WTOPnews.com – Michael Greenberger, JD, professor at the School of Law and director of the Center for Health and Homeland Security, talked about the arrest of six foreign-born Muslims who are accused of plotting to attack the Army’s Fort Dix and massacre scores of U.S. soldiers.

Friday, May 4, 2007

Professor Helen Norton

The Daily Record – Helen Norton, JD, visiting assistant professor at the School of Law, said that the employee-supervisor conflict which arose at a sport’s apparel company in many ways does not apply to the majority of the work force, but it does offer guidance for employees and employers in terms of defining cause. "Employees definitely want to define good cause as specifically and narrowly as possible," Norton said. Employers, she said, would want to deviate as little as possible from an at-will contract; but if they do include good cause, "they would want to define it broadly."

Friday, May 4, 2007

Adjunct Professor James Astrachan

The Daily Record – James Astrachan, JD, adjunct professor at the School of Law, discussed typosquatting. The practice involves registering domain names that might result from less-than-careful typing on the part of an Internet searcher in order to direct them through particular "affiliate" sites to get to the one they want is a scam that infringes on trademarks.

Thursday, May 3, 2007

Adjunct Professor Andrew Levy

The Daily Record – The Harford County State’s Attorney’s office is in an unusual situation this week, essentially prosecuting anew a man who has already been found guilty of murder. This time around, Jamaal Abeokuto asked that a jury decide his fate. "To decide what is an appropriate sentence, the jury will have to hear the facts of the case," said Andrew Levy, JD, adjunct professor at the School of Law. "That is because the law as interpreted by the U.S. Supreme Court requires the sentencing inquiry to be an individual, case-specific one, that takes into account both the facts of the case and the defendant’s unique circumstances," he said.

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500 W. Baltimore Street, Baltimore, MD 21201-1786 PHONE: (410) 706-7214 FAX: (410) 706-4045 / TDD: (410) 706-7714

Copyright © 2014, University of Maryland Francis King Carey School of Law. All Rights Reserved