Faculty in the News - Archive



Thursday, June 7, 2007

Professor Michael Greenberger

BBC Radio – Michael Greenberger, JD, professor at the School of Law and director of the Center for Health and Homeland Security, discussed the plot to attack John F. Kennedy International Airport in New York.

Wednesday, June 6, 2007

Professor Michael Greenberger

WUSA-TV, Ch. 9 – The 30-month sentence handed down by U.S. District Judge Reggie Walton on former White House aide Lewis "Scooter" Libby was long but not unexpected. "I wasn’t surprised at the sentence because he is known as a tough sentencer," said Michael Greenberger, JD, professor at the School of Law, director of the Center for Health and Homeland, and former Department of Justice official.

Wednesday, June 6, 2007

Professor Michael Greenberger

Newsday (published in one additional newspaper and two Web sites) - When a U.S. Attorney described the alleged terror plot to blow up John F. Kennedy International Airport as "one of the most chilling plots imaginable," which might have caused "unthinkable" devastation, some law enforcement officials criticized the initial characterizations as questionable and overhyped. "I think they were correct to take this seriously," said Michael Greenberger, JD, professor at the School of Law and director of the Center for Health and Homeland Security. "But there’s a pattern here of Justice Department attorneys overstating what they have. I think they feel under tremendous pressure to vindicate the elaborate counterterrorism structure they’ve created since Sept. 11, including the Patriot Act."

Wednesday, June 6, 2007

Professor Michael Greenberger

WCBS Newsradio 880 – Michael Greenberger, JD, professor at the School of Law and director of the Center for Health and Homeland Security, discussed the plot to attack John F. Kennedy International Airport in New York.

Wednesday, June 6, 2007

Professor Sherrilyn Ifill

Diverse: Issues In Higher Education – Two lynchings, in 1931 and 1933, were the last recorded in Maryland, and it’s unclear whether any witnesses to the events are still alive. But those events and other incidents of racial violence in the Jim Crow era on the Eastern Shore still affect the region, School of Law professor Sherrilyn Ifill, JD, argues in her book, On The Courthouse Lawn: Confronting the Legacy of Lynching in the Twenty-first Century. "The wounds of white supremacy," Ifill writes, "still stand open and untreated."

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Copyright © 2014, University of Maryland Francis King Carey School of Law. All Rights Reserved