Faculty in the News - Archive



Thursday, December 13, 2007

Dean Karen Rothenberg

The Daily Record, DailyRecord.com, The Baltimore Business Journal – The Maryland Stem Cell Research Commission has received 127 letters of intent from researchers vying to win $23 million in state funding. The commission, created to help spark growth in the state’s life sciences industry, awarded researchers $15 million earlier this year. Scientists at Johns Hopkins University, the University of Maryland, Baltimore, and the University of Maryland’s College Park campus dominated the first batch of grants. "The point is there are many different ways to address these [health] issues," said Karen H. Rothenberg, JD, MPA, dean of the School of Law and a commission member. "Our commission allows all approaches. We need to let a thousand flowers bloom."

Thursday, December 13, 2007

Professor Douglas Colbert

The Daily Record, DailyRecord.com – In the Baltimore City Criminal Justice Coordinating Council’s (CJCC) last meeting of the year, members rallied around a proposal to minimize the time nonviolent suspects spend in jail before their trials. Douglas Colbert, JD, a School of Law professor who regularly attends CJCC meetings, announced that the six students in his "Access to Justice" clinic had assisted in the release of 31 of 45 such defendants this past semester by representing them at bail review hearings. He called for the Office of the Public Defender, the Office of the State’s Attorney, and the Division of Pretrial Detention and Services to come up with an ongoing list of nonviolent defendants awaiting trial, and to pool their manpower so that each defendant’s full story can be presented to the judge at the bail review hearing. "We can do better," Colbert said. "Let’s figure out how we can give more attention to people who are accused of nonviolent crimes and can’t afford bail. Let’s take a closer look."

Thursday, December 13, 2007

Professor Michael Greenberger

E&E Daily – The Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) has authority to regulate any entity that affects physical natural gas or electricity prices, key members of the House Energy and Commerce Committee said on Wednesday at a hearing on energy market speculation. Both FERC and the Commodity Futures Trading Commission (CFTC) have commenced legal proceedings against the former hedge fund Amaranth Advisors LLC for illegal activity in the natural gas futures market in 2006. This is the first time FERC has used its new enforcement authority. The jurisdictional battle was part of a broader hearing on the effect exempt commercial futures markets―such as the Intercontinental Exchange were having on energy prices because of unregulated excessive speculation. Energy futures markets, including oil and natural gas, and others that only involved "sophisticated" participants were exempted from CFTC regulation by a provision in the 2000 CFTC reauthorization act. Michael Greenberger, JD, a former CFTC director of the Division of Trading and Markets and currently a professor at the School of Law and director of the Center for Health and Homeland Security, said there was a simple fix to the regulation problem. "The simplest way to repeal it is to add two words to the act, so it reads: an exempt commodity does ‘not include’ an agriculture or energy commodity," Greenberger said. Rep. Bart Stupak (D-Mich.), chairman of the subcommittee, said after the hearing he thought Greenberger’s idea was "an interesting thing to look at."

Wednesday, December 12, 2007

Adjunct Professor Andrew Levy

The Baltimore Sun, Baltimoresun.com – A day after the Supreme Court restored substantial power to federal judges to hand down sentences below recommended guidelines, the U.S. Sentencing Commission gave them additional authority to reduce prison terms for those already locked up for crack cocaine-related crimes. "I would hope that there would be some triaging so they would deal with those cases first," said Andrew D. Levy, JD, an adjunct professor at the School of Law and attorney who practices in federal court. "Although judges will have more latitude now, the sentencing guidelines still recommend harsher penalties in crack-related cases."

Wednesday, December 12, 2007

Adjunct Professor Andrew Levy

The Baltimore Sun, Baltimoresun.com – Attorneys for the former Randallstown High School student sentenced to 100 years in prison for shooting into a crowd of students on the school parking lot in 2004 asked a judge yesterday to grant him a new sentencing hearing, arguing that the prison term was "unconstitutionally disproportionate." Andrew Levy, JD, an adjunct professor at the School of Law and an attorney, testified that, "A very good argument can be made that it was grossly disproportionate to the offense, taken on its own terms and, when compared to other sentences in Maryland, it is virtually off the charts."

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500 W. Baltimore Street, Baltimore, MD 21201-1786 PHONE: (410) 706-7214 FAX: (410) 706-4045 / TDD: (410) 706-7714

Copyright © 2014, University of Maryland Francis King Carey School of Law. All Rights Reserved