Faculty in the News - Archive



Sunday, August 19, 2007

Professor Michael Greenberger

The Associated Press (published in 33 newspapers and 41 Web sites) - The Sept. 11, 2001, attacks cast a long shadow over the terrorism support trial of Brooklyn-born Jose Padilla and his two co-defendants, with prosecutors constantly emphasizing al-Qaida connections and some of the most riveting testimony given by Osama bin Laden himself in the form of a decade-old TV interview. "There’s the old saying that when you lie down with dogs, you get fleas," said Michael Greenberger, JD, professor at the School of Law and director of the Center for Health and Homeland Security. "It’s fair game for the prosecutors to mention al-Qaida and for Osama bin Laden to be portrayed."

Sunday, August 19, 2007

Professor Orde Kittrie

The Arizona Republic – Authorities fear the fake-document industry will grow even more as migrants look for ways to circumvent Arizona’s new employer-sanctions law and a new Bush administration crackdown on illegal workers. "Like other crime associated with illegal immigration, the fraudulent-document trade has flourished because the nation’s immigration system is broken," said Orde Kittrie, JD, visiting associate professor at the School of Law. "The system does not allow enough immigrants to enter legally to meet the labor demands of the expanding U.S. economy," he said.

Saturday, August 18, 2007

Professor Michael Greenberger

Reuters (published in 11 newspapers and 32 Web sites) - The Sept. 11, 2001, attacks cast a long shadow over the terrorism support trial of Brooklyn-born Jose Padilla and his two co-defendants, with prosecutors constantly emphasizing al-Qaida connections and some of the most riveting testimony given by Osama bin Laden himself in the form of a decade-old TV interview. "There’s the old saying that when you lie down with dogs, you get fleas," said Michael Greenberger, JD, professor at the School of Law and director of the Center for Health and Homeland Security. "It’s fair game for the prosecutors to mention al-Qaida and for Osama bin Laden to be portrayed."

Friday, August 17, 2007

Professor Michael Greenberger

ABCNews.com – After five years of incarceration, a jury found Jose Padilla guilty of terrorism charges. In many ways, Padilla is a test case for President Bush’s legal war on terror since the attacks of Sept. 11, 2001. John Ashcroft, attorney general at the time, gave an unusual televised statement, telling the world of Padilla’s capture at O’Hare International Airport in Chicago. Ashcroft said that authorities had "disrupted an unfolding terrorist plot to attack the United States by exploding a radioactive ‘dirty bomb.’" Michael Greenberger, JD, professor at the School of Law and director of the Center for Health and Homeland Security, said the announcement introduced the administration’s novel legal strategy: "The Ashcroft announcement was the first articulation of what came to be called the enemy combatant theory, and the first time a United States citizen would be deemed an enemy combatant."

Friday, August 17, 2007

Professor Michael Greenberger

The New York Times (and at least four other papers) – Some experts said the very success of the Padilla prosecution raised doubts about the administration’s insistence that the terrorism threat cannot be handled in the civilian justice system. "This demonstrates, at least for now, that the United States is fully capable of prosecuting terrorism while affording defendants the full procedural protections of the Constitution," said Michael Greenberger, JD, who served in the Clinton administration Justice Department and teaches a Law of Counterterrorism course at the School of Law.

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Copyright © 2014, University of Maryland Francis King Carey School of Law. All Rights Reserved