Faculty in the News - Archive



Saturday, December 15, 2007

Adjunct Professor Andrew Levy

WBAL-TV, Ch. 11, WBALTV.com – An analysis of 18 months’ worth of data provided by the Baltimore City State’s Attorney’s Office revealed that prosecutors are more likely to offer a deal than go to trial in murder cases. In 2006, 56.1 percent of murder charges were settled by plea bargain, and in the first six months of 2007, prosecutors offered a plea deal 48.9 percent of the time. "For the most part, plea deals are a function of two variables: the strength of the case as assessed by the prosecutor and the likely sentence that the defendant will get if convicted," said Andrew Levy, JD, adjunct professor at the School of Law.

Friday, December 14, 2007

Adjunct Professor Morton Fisher

The Daily Record, DailyRecord.com – Plaintiffs seeking monetary damages will have to do a little more mathematical legwork before they file in court, following the Court of Special Appeals’ decision that said complainants must ask for a certain sum rather than a minimum amount. "The case stands for the proposition that you must be very careful what you ask for and be very specific in the damages clause," said Morton Fisher Jr., JD, adjunct professor at the School of Law and a real estate attorney at Ballard Spahr Andrews & Ingersoll LLP.

Friday, December 14, 2007

Adjunct Professor James Astrachan

The Washington Times, Washingtontimes.com – While Major League Baseball looks to enact the recommendations laid out by former Sen. George Mitchell in his report on performance-enhancing drugs in the game, league officials are readying themselves for the possibility of lawsuits from players. With more than 80 names now linked to the use of steroids, human growth hormone, and other drugs, legal experts say lawsuits for libel and defamation of character may not be too far behind. But, they say, players have minimal chances of winning any suits. "You can say, ‘I’ve been defamed,’ but unless you can establish that [Mitchell] should have known, you’re not actionably defamed," said James Astrachan, JD, adjunct professor at the School of Law.

Thursday, December 13, 2007

Professor Michael Greenberger

The Associated Press (also published in three newspapers and two Web sites), Burlington (Vt.) Free Press, BurlingtonFreePress.com, Bennington (Vt.) Banner, BenningtonBanner.com, HedgeWorld.com - A subcommittee of the U.S. House of Representatives heard from witnesses Wednesday on the consequences of energy speculation and on the regulatory framework for the trading of energy-related commodities and their derivatives. Commodities traders investing in the energy futures market can drive up costs by gobbling up energy contracts before winter weather hits and holding onto them until temperatures plummet, said Michael Greenberger, JD, professor at the School of Law, director of the Center for Health and Homeland Security, and former director of the division of trading and markets at the Commodity Futures Trading Commission, who testified at the hearing.

Thursday, December 13, 2007

Adjunct Professor Andrew Levy

WMAR-TV, Ch. 2 – The federal government is making big changes in the sentencing of criminals caught with crack cocaine. In a decision that could reopen more than 20,000 cases, the U.S. Sentencing Commission has given federal judges the power to reduce prison terms for crack offenders. For decades the debate has waged with many upset that the crack possession sentence is much more harsh than cocaine offenses. "African- Americans involved with crack were sentenced much more heavily than whites involved in an equal amount of cocaine," said Andrew Levy, JD, an adjunct professor at the School of Law and attorney who practices in federal court. "It’s been recognized for a long time that that was very unjust."

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Copyright © 2014, University of Maryland Francis King Carey School of Law. All Rights Reserved