Faculty in the News - Archive



Thursday, September 6, 2007

Professor Michael Greenberger

The Washington Post Ė Hobbled by inadequate funding, unclear priorities, continuing reorganization, and the absence of an overarching strategy, the Department of Homeland Security is failing to achieve its mission of preventing and responding to terrorist attacks or natural disasters, according to a comprehensive report released today by the U.S. Government Accountability Office (GAO). "Itís a very damning report," said Michael Greenberger, JD, professor at the School of Law and director of the Center for Health and Homeland Security. "If you look at these grades, nearly one-third fall into the lowest category, and among those third are critically important, almost foundational tasks upon which the others rest."

Thursday, September 6, 2007

Professor Michael Greenberger

WTTG-TV, Ch. 5 - An Islamic Web site has reported that it will soon show a new video of al-Qaida leader Osama bin Laden the first in nearly three years to mark the sixth anniversary of the Sept. 11 attacks on the United States. Michael Greenberger, JD, professor at the School of Law and director of the Center for Health and Homeland Security, said such a tape would serve as a stark reminder. "His continued surfacing is a reminder to the American people that we have almost certainly been fighting the wrong threat in the wrong place at the wrong time, losing a great deal of American treasure and blood in so doing," Greenberger said.

Thursday, September 6, 2007

Professor Michael Greenberger

USA Today Ė A comprehensive report released by the federal Government Accountability Office is highly critical of the progress being made by the Department of Homeland Security. The report said the massive bureaucracy failed to meet 78 of 171 objectives, including those that were set after the Sept. 11 attacks and Hurricane Katrina exposed weaknesses in the government's ability to handle emergencies. "Itís a very damning report," said Michael Greenberger, JD, professor at the School of Law and director of the Center for Health and Homeland Security.

Wednesday, September 5, 2007

Professor Mark Graber

The Frederick News-Post (published in 13 additional newspapers and on five Web sites) - Two Frederick County commissioners say they are willing to take their desire to deny illegal immigrants access to county-funded programs, including education and social services, to the U.S. Supreme Court. The cost of defending a lawsuit that goes to the Supreme Court can range from nothing to more than $1 million, said Mark Graber, JD, PhD, MA, professor at the School of Law. "It would cost nothing if a legal group committed to denying benefits to illegal immigrants stepped forward and offered to defend the case for free," Graber said. Otherwise, a top Supreme Court lawyer may charge as much as $800 per hour. "One has to wonder whether, at the end of the day, they would be better just opening a free school for children of illegal immigrants and not paying for the lawsuit," he said.

Wednesday, September 5, 2007

Professor Michael Greenberger

Capital News Service (published in 24 newspapers and on 16 Web sites) - An incident involving a turban pat-down at Baltimore/Washington International Thurgood Marshall Airport has sparked concern in Marylandís Sikh community, among the largest in the country, about erosion of civil liberties in the name of security. The Transportation Security Administration (TSA) changed its policy on head coverings last month to give screeners the discretion to subject anyone wearing headgear to additional security screening. "I would like to know how many times they have had to pat down a cowboy hat or beret," said Michael Greenberger, JD, professor at the School of Law and director of the Center for Health and Homeland Security. "By including these items with the turban, they are trying to mask the fact that they are focused on people of Middle Eastern or Asian background, and are really going after religious gear." The idea of universally submitting everyone to headgear screening is overly broad unless the TSA can offer a rationale for the policy change and can explain how this is the least intrusive apporach, Greenberger said.

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Copyright © 2014, University of Maryland Francis King Carey School of Law. All Rights Reserved