Faculty in the News - Archive



Thursday, September 27, 2007

Professor Sherrilyn Ifill

The Houston Chronicle – A couple of weeks into classes at the University of Maryland, College Park, a rope tied into what looked like a noose was found hanging outside the campus’ African-American cultural center. In some cases, "the power is in the silence that surrounds these symbols," said Sherrilyn Ifill, JD, professor at the School of Law. "We don’t talk openly about why a noose is such a provocative symbol because we don’t talk much about our history of lynching."

Thursday, September 27, 2007

Professor Michael Greenberger

Associated Press (published in 27 newspapers and 44 Web sites) - A federal judge has ruled two provisions of the Patriot Act are unconstitutional because they allow search warrants to be issued without probable cause. The case began when the FBI misidentified a fingerprint in the Madrid train bombings in 2004, leading investigators to a Portland attorney, whose home and office were secretly searched and bugged. Michael Greenberger, JD, professor in the School of Law and director of the Center for Health and Homeland Security, called the judge’s analysis of the law "extraordinarily sound" and said the bungled government investigation opened the door to the Patriot Act challenge by finally allowing someone to show the government is using a secret court called the Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Court to bypass the Constitution.

Wednesday, September 26, 2007

Professor Sherrilyn Ifill

The Washington Post – A couple of weeks into classes at the University of Maryland, College Park, a rope tied into what looked like a noose was found hanging outside the campus’ African-American cultural center. In some cases, "the power is in the silence that surrounds these symbols," said Sherrilyn Ifill, JD, professor at the School of Law. "We don’t talk openly about why a noose is such a provocative symbol because we don’t talk much about our history of lynching."

Wednesday, September 26, 2007

Professor Michael Greenberger

ABCNews.com – A federal judge has ruled two provisions of the Patriot Act are unconstitutional because they allow search warrants to be issued without probable cause. The case began when the FBI misidentified a fingerprint in the Madrid train bombings in 2004, leading investigators to a Portland attorney, whose home and office were secretly searched and bugged. Michael Greenberger, JD, professor in the School of Law and director of the Center for Health and Homeland Security, called the judge’s analysis of the law "extraordinarily sound" and said the bungled government investigation opened the door to the Patriot Act challenge by finally allowing someone to show the government is using a secret court called the Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Court to bypass the Constitution.

Tuesday, September 25, 2007

Professor Orde Kittrie

WBAL-TV, Ch. 11, WBALTV.com – According to new FBI statistics, the number of violent crimes rose 2 percent across the nation from 2005 to 2006, but in Maryland the number dropped by about 2 percent. "There was a slight decrease in the robbery rate. There was a slight decrease in the murder rate. But we can’t celebrate too much. We have to ask what it is we’re doing here at the No. 2 second worst rate," said Orde Kittrie, JD, visiting associate professor at the School of Law. He pointed out that Maryland in 2006 had the second highest per capita murder rate in the nation, behind only Louisiana, and the second highest per capita robbery rate in the nation, behind only Nevada.

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