Faculty in the News - Archive



Tuesday, October 2, 2007

Professor Michael Greenberger

Reading Eagle – A federal judge in Oregon was absolutely right when she ruled two provisions of the Patriot Act violate the Fourth Amendment of the Constitution, said Michael Greenberger, JD, professor at the School of Law and director of the Center for Health and Homeland Security. He told The Associated Press that the judge’s analysis of the law, which guarantees the right of the people to be secure in their persons, houses, papers and effects against unreasonable searches and seizures, was extraordinarily sound.

Monday, October 1, 2007

Dean Karen Rothenberg

The Daily Record – Questions about the organization's history will be answered on Oct. 11 at a School of Law symposium, "Maryland Legal Services Corp. 25th Anniversary Symposium." Dean Karen Rothenberg, JD, MPA, will give the opening address. The symposium has been developed by the University of Maryland Law Journal of Race, Religion, Gender and Class, which will be publishing articles and materials from the event in a future issue. "The publication provides a forum for scholarship focusing on people who lack access to justice," said editor in chief Samantha Kravitz, a third-year student.

Monday, October 1, 2007

Adjunct Professor Andrew Levy

The Daily Record – Last year, The Daily Record reported on the "CSI effect," a phenomenon in which jurors allegedly won’t convict without the high-tech forensic evidence they see every night on television police dramas. But is there such a thing as too much evidence? "It can be very dry and technical, there’s no question about it," said Andrew Levy, JD, adjunct law professor at the School of Law and partner at Brown, Goldstein & Levy, LLP. "A good trial lawyer ought to let the jury know that in the opening statement. They give the jury a preview of what the evidence is going to be and what to expect in the case."

Saturday, September 29, 2007

Professor Doug Colbert

The Baltimore Sun – In the Saturday Mailbox section, Douglas Colbert, JD, a professor at the School of Law, wrote a letter supporting the call for education about the history of lynching that Sherrilyn Ifill, JD, a professor at the School, issued in her Op-Ed last week.

Friday, September 28, 2007

Professor Michael Greenberger

Associated Press (published in 7 newspapers and 15 Web sites) - A federal judge has ruled two provisions of the Patriot Act are unconstitutional because they allow search warrants to be issued without probable cause. The case began when the FBI misidentified a fingerprint in the Madrid train bombings in 2004, leading investigators to a Portland attorney, whose home and office were secretly searched and bugged. Michael Greenberger, JD, professor at the School of Law and director of the Center for Health and Homeland Security, called the judge’s analysis of the law "extraordinarily sound" and said the bungled government investigation opened the door to the Patriot Act challenge by finally allowing someone to show the government is using a secret court called the Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Court to bypass the Constitution.

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