Faculty in the News - Archive



Monday, October 15, 2007

Professor Sherrilyn Ifill

"News and Notes," National Public Radio, NPR.org - As part of a roundtable discussion, Sherrilyn Ifill, JD, professor at the School of Law, talked about how the U.S. court system brought about social change. "It had been a long road for civil rights litigation," Ifill said. "The lawyers didn’t sit down then, they continued to litigate cases, some they won, some they lost, they were pushing a rock up a hill, until the conditions were right in which they could effect change. And I think that’s the period we’re in now."

Sunday, October 14, 2007

Professor Orde Kittrie

The Annapolis Capital – Annapolis officials and a new community group disagree over what crime numbers released by the city, crime statistics compiled by the FBI, and census data mean about violence in the city. Orde Kittrie, JD, visiting associate professor at the School of Law who teaches classes on state crime trends, said the city’s crime rate is still too high. "The slight drop from 2006 to 2007 is nice, but what’s more important is the baseline is so much higher than the national average," he said. "If I lived in Annapolis, I’d be concerned."

Sunday, October 14, 2007

Professor Jana Singer

The Annapolis Capital – The gay marriage case came to the Court of Appeals of Maryland after the Circuit Court of Baltimore City found the state’s Family Law Article violated the Equal Rights Amendment (ERA) to the Maryland Constitution. The majority’s opinion that overturned the ruling is very "myopic" when it comes to its interpretation of the ERA and the importance of marriage, said Jana Singer, JD, professor at the School of Law. Allowing men and women to be considered as classes is contrary to the purpose of state and federal protection laws that are meant to safeguard people as individuals, Singer said.

Friday, October 12, 2007

Professor Sherrilyn Ifill

Newsday – "It was designed to send a signal to the whole black community," said Sherrilyn Ifill, JD, professor at the School of Law. "Lynching was always a message crime. It wasn’t just about killing the black person who supposedly transgressed some racial code. So hanging the noose is a message of intimidation." Unlike the swastika or a burning cross, the symbolism of the noose and the history of lynching has yet to be confronted, Ifill said.

Thursday, October 11, 2007

Professor Kathleen Dachille

The Baltimore Sun – Baltimore health officials proposed Wednesday requiring that all cigarettes sold in the city meet enhanced fire-safety standards a move that they say would help prevent tragedies like the May fire that killed eight people in East Baltimore. Kathleen Dachille, JD, assistant professor at the School of Law, director of School’s Legal Resource Center for Tobacco Regulation, Litigation and Advocacy, and a legal advocate for stricter tobacco regulation, said the move toward fire-safe cigarettes is extraordinary. "The way this has been methodically passed in about 23 jurisdictions in the last year, that’s very rapid progress for a bill."

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Copyright © 2014, University of Maryland Francis King Carey School of Law. All Rights Reserved