Faculty in the News - Archive



Friday, November 2, 2007

Professor Sherrilyn Ifill

The New York Times – New York City Mayor Michael Bloomberg caused a public fury when he said that a police officer who had died of a drug overdose not because of the toxins he inhaled during hundreds of hours working at ground zero was not a hero. In the process, he reinforced the sentiment that the whole subject of heroes has turned into a rhetorical third rail. This state of affairs gets more complicated in comparison to another recent headline: race in America. Despite a feeling to the contrary during protests in Louisiana, "I don’t regard Mychal Bell or the other teens that comprise the Jena 6 as ‘heroes,’ " Sherrilyn Ifill, JD, professor at the School of Law, wrote on a blog called Blackprof.com.

Friday, November 2, 2007

Professor Christopher Brown

The Baltimore Sun – A federal jury in Baltimore awarded nearly $11 million to the father of a Marine killed in Iraq, deciding that the family’s privacy had been invaded by a Kansas church whose members waved anti-gay and anti-war signs at the funeral. C. Christopher Brown, JD, associate professor emeritus at the School of Law, said it can be difficult but not impossible to collect damages. He won damages for a client against a child abuser three years ago and is still trying to collect; but in another case, it took a mere couple of months. Sometimes, he said, "It’s a paper victory. You have piece of paper that says you’ve been awarded $11 million." Though he continued, "You still have to hunt it down. You can spend a lot of money hunting it down."

Thursday, November 1, 2007

Professor Mark Graber

The Baltimore Sun (published in five newspapers and Web sites), The Associated Press (published in 35 newspapers and 23 Web sites) - A federal jury in Baltimore awarded nearly $11 million yesterday to the father of a Marine killed in Iraq, deciding that the family’s privacy had been invaded by a Kansas church whose members waved anti-gay and anti-war signs at the funeral. Mark Graber, JD, PhD, MA, professor at the School of Law, said the size of the award, which included $8 million in punitive damages, could have a chilling effect on speech. "This was in a public space," Graber said. "While the actions are reprehensible, the First Amendment protects a lot that’s reprehensible."

Monday, October 29, 2007

Professor Mark Graber

The Associated Press (published in 35 newspapers and 21 Web sites) - Albert Snyder, of York, Pa., is seeking monetary damages from a fundamentalist Kansas church that routinely pickets at the funerals of troops killed in Iraq and elsewhere after members protested outside the March 2006 burial of his son in Westminster. Whether the pickets are an invasion of privacy and an intentional attempt to cause emotional distress, and should be forced to pay damages in punishment, is what jurors in a federal civil case are considering in U.S. District Court in Baltimore. "I’m not sure that will work," said Mark Graber, JD, PhD, MA, a professor at the School of Law who specializes in constitutional law. Even if the protesters’ speech is found not to be protected by the First Amendment, that "doesn’t mean that the people can be punished," Graber said, noting protesting at a funeral was not against state law at the time, although it is now.

Monday, October 29, 2007

Professor Lawrence Sung

The Daily Record, Dolan Media Newswire – (published in four newspapers) - A move aimed at creating a more efficient process at the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office is generating some criticism from attorneys and their clients across the country. New broad-sweeping rules to the claims and continuation practices that take effect Nov. 1 and apply retroactively will influence pending and future patent applications. "The difficulty when you make such a massive change is that you never know if you will have the unintended consequence of creating a whole new set of problems," said Lawrence Sung, JD, PhD, professor at the School of Law and director of the Intellectual Property Law Program.

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Copyright © 2014, University of Maryland Francis King Carey School of Law. All Rights Reserved