Faculty in the News - Archive



Thursday, November 8, 2007

Professor Michael Greenberger

The Baltimore Sun – Investors watched global oil markets yesterday as the price of crude flirted with the $100-per-barrel milestone, raising the prospect of higher costs for everything from gasoline to groceries. Investors from hedge funds to banks are pouring money into unregulated oil futures markets, which industry officials often refer to as "dark markets" because they lack oversight. "It just so happens that these kinds of futures contracts can be manipulated if nobody is watching," said Michael Greenberger, JD, a professor at the School of Law and an expert on futures markets.

Thursday, November 8, 2007

Professor Michael Greenberger

The Baltimore Sun – "The consumer has got to be made aware that the high price they are paying does not necessarily reflect supply and demand, but rigged markets by hedge funds and big banks that are profiting greatly from this kind of trading," said Michael Greenberger, JD, a professor at the School of Law and an expert on futures markets, in a pullout quote in the editorial section.

Monday, November 5, 2007

Professor Mark Graber

The Daily Record – A federal jury in Baltimore awarded nearly $11 million to the father of a Marine killed in Iraq, deciding that the family’s privacy had been invaded by a Kansas church whose members waved anti-gay and anti-war signs at the funeral. "Before citizens and attorneys begin mutual congratulations," writes Mark Graber, JD, PhD, MA, professor at the School of Law, in this Op-Ed, "questions should be asked about whether there was a law against [church leader] Fred Phelps and whether that law is worthy of celebration. American history suggests caution about jury decisions that find hated speakers have violated some law and merit exceptionally severe sanctions."

Monday, November 5, 2007

Professor Michael Greenberger

The Christian Science Monitor, CSMonitor.com – The federal government’s efforts to create a standardized, secure driver’s license that would also serve as a national ID card have hit some significant stumbling blocks. One reason is the price tag, estimated at $14.6 billion. There’s also concern about how difficult it would be to implement. Homeland security experts say such a standardized identification system would be helpful in maintaining security. "This could assure you that people are not using false identifications and boarding planes under false pretenses," said Michael Greenberger, JD, professor at the School of Law and director of the Center for Health and Homeland Security. "But there are a lot of strong arguments against it. It has become very unpopular, politically."

Monday, November 5, 2007

Professor Michael Greenberger

CBSNews.com (published in two additional Web sites) - The federal government’s efforts to create a standardized, secure driver’s license that would also serve as a national ID card have hit some significant stumbling blocks. One reason is the price tag, estimated at $14.6 billion. There’s also concern about how difficult it would be to implement. Homeland security experts say such a standardized identification system would be helpful in maintaining security. "This could assure you that people are not using false identifications and boarding planes under false pretenses," said Michael Greenberger, JD, professor at the School of Law and director of the Center for Health and Homeland Security. "But there are a lot of strong arguments against it. It has become very unpopular, politically."

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500 W. Baltimore Street, Baltimore, MD 21201-1786 PHONE: (410) 706-7214 FAX: (410) 706-4045 / TDD: (410) 706-7714

Copyright © 2014, University of Maryland Francis King Carey School of Law. All Rights Reserved