Faculty in the News - Archive



Tuesday, January 17, 2006

Professors Christopher Brown and Mark Grabber

The Washington Times, and two more newspapers - Three of the seven judges who make up Maryland's highest court will reach mandatory retirement age during the next governor's term, producing an unusually high turnover rate and giving whomever is elected in November a rare opportunity to mold the court. "What's at stake really is that the next governor will very much get to set the political tone of the Court of Appeals' makeup," said Christopher Brown, JD, an associate professor at the School of Law, who has compiled statistics on the judges' votes to determine who is liberal or conservative. Despite the potentially high stakes, the makeup of the Court of Appeals is not likely to become a campaign issue, said Mark Graber, PhD, JD, professor at the School of Law.

Sunday, January 15, 2006

Adjunct Professor Andrew Baida

The Daily Record, and two more newspapers - Andrew Baida, JD, an adjunct professor at the School of Law, wrote an opinion column explaining how to write persuasively when writing a legal argument.

Saturday, January 14, 2006

Assistant Dean Teresa LaMaster

The Chicago Tribune Blogs, short for "Web logs," personal postings on the Internet that are usually personal and opinionated, are a new source of employer-employee trouble. There are many existing laws regarding what employees can and can't say about their employers. "What is different about blogging is that it makes those public statements worldwide in a matter of nanoseconds," said Teresa LaMaster, JD, assistant dean for technology affairs and chief information officer at the School of Law.

Saturday, January 14, 2006

Professor Michael Greenberger

United for Progresss, WHYL 960 AM Harrisburg, Pa. Michael Greenberger, JD, professor at the School of Law and director of the University of Maryland Center for Health and Homeland Security, discussed the U.S. Supreme Court confirmation hearings for Judge Samuel Alito.

Friday, January 13, 2006

Professors William Reynolds and Mark Graber`

The Daily Record Three of the seven judges who make up Maryland's highest court will reach mandatory retirement age during the next governor's term, producing an unusually high turnover rate and giving whomever is elected in November a rare opportunity to mold the court. William Reynolds, JD, professor at the School of Law, said that in areas such as the death penalty and products liability, where the courts are still hammering out what state law says, so many changes to the Court of Appeals could leave lawyers struggling to advise their clients on the right course of action. Mark Graber, PhD, JD, professor at the School of Law, said that interest groups will certainly be lobbying behind the scenes to influence the governor's choice.

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Copyright © 2014, University of Maryland Francis King Carey School of Law. All Rights Reserved