Faculty in the News - Archive



Tuesday, February 7, 2006

Professor Christopher Brown

WBFF-TV – A Baltimore family is suing the drunk driver who killed three relatives two years ago while driving an airport taxi van. The lawsuit also names Enterprise Leasing, which leased the van to the man’s employer, Baltimare Shuttle. Christopher Brown, JD, associate professor at the School of Law, said the court will try to find out if Enterprise in any way controlled the action of Baltimare’s employees.

Monday, February 6, 2006

Professor Douglas Colbert

WBAL-TV - The Maryland Court of Appeals issued a stay of execution Monday for Vernon Evans Jr. Doug Colbert, JD, professor at the School of Law, said the high court's ruling may signal a re-examination of the death penalty in Maryland.

Monday, February 6, 2006

Professor Michael Greenberger

ABC World News Tonight – Jury selection began in the sentencing phase of confessed al-Qaida conspirator Zacarias Moussaoui. Michael Greenberger, JD, professor at the School of Law and director of the University of Maryland Center for Health and Homeland Security, described Moussaoui's demeanor in the courtroom as "hostile."

Sunday, February 5, 2006

Professor Irving Breitowitz

The Washington Post – Sarah Rosenbloom and her husband divorced seven years ago in Maryland civil court. But she remains married under Jewish law because he has refused to give her a religious divorce document known in Hebrew as a get. Women in Rosenbloom's situation are called agunah in Hebrew, which means "chained woman." "The agunah problem is a very serious one. [It] is one aspect of a greater recognition of family problems that maybe we've been sweeping under the carpet," said Irving Breitowitz, JD, associate professor at the School of Law and a rabbi who wrote a book about agunah. "We are bound by the principles, but we can try to devise new mechanisms."

Saturday, February 4, 2006

Professor Christopher Brown

The Baltimore Sun – Whoever is elected governor in November will have an unusual opportunity to quickly shape Maryland's highest court because of the mandatory retirement of three of the seven judges in the first 18 months of the next gubernatorial term. "The three judges who will retire the soonest are among the most conservative on the top bench," said Christopher Brown, JD, assistant professor at the School of Law, who has analyzed split decisions by the court.

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500 W. Baltimore Street, Baltimore, MD 21201-1786 PHONE: (410) 706-7214 FAX: (410) 706-4045 / TDD: (410) 706-7714

Copyright © 2014, University of Maryland Francis King Carey School of Law. All Rights Reserved