Faculty in the News - Archive



Sunday, March 26, 2006

Professor Michael Greenberger

USA Today - Prosecutors rested their case last week in the sentencing trial of confessed al-Qaida conspirator Zacarias Moussaoui, but many of the government's witnesses have made it clear how difficult it may be for the government to prevail in the landmark terrorism case, legal analysts said. "It's not at all clear that had Moussaoui told them everything, the FBI would have been able to do anything," said Michael Greenberger, JD, professor at the School of Law and director of the Center for Health and Homeland Security.

Saturday, March 25, 2006

Professor Abraham Dash

The Washington Post - Brian Denton, the public defender for Prince George's County, is trying to convice the Maryland General Assembly that some of the provisions of a bill to increase the restrictions for convicted sex offenders go too far. Abraham Dash, JD, professor at the School of Law whose criminal proceedings class 24 years ago persuaded Denton to ditch his plans for a more lucrative practice, doesn’t sympathize much either. Dash said he teaches students about the value in representing the despised in the courtroom, but not in the legislative chambers in Annapolis. "I’m supportive of being tough on sex offenders," Dash said.

Saturday, March 25, 2006

Professor David Bogen

The Daily Record – David Bogen, JD, professor at the School of Law, was honored for his leadership and support of the Maryland Public Interest Law Project at the School of Law, when the 17th annual Goods & Services Auction was held at Westminster Hall on March 11.

Friday, March 24, 2006

Professor Andrew Levy

The Baltimore Sun – A former Hopkins lacrosse star will be sentenced in May to up to a year in jail for driving while intoxicated and causing a car crash that killed his best friend. Largely at the request of the victim’s parents, prosecutors did not pursue more serious charges, which could have sent the man to prison for up to 10 years. "The law is all about making distinctions and drawing lines and weighing punishments, and this is another example of that," said Andrew Levy, JD, adjunct professor at the School of Law.

Friday, March 24, 2006

Professor Williams Reynolds

The Daily Record – Lawyers who argue in front of Maryland’s Court of Special Appeals and the 4th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals, which includes Maryland, find out on the morning of argument which judges will hear their cases, which is different from the practice in the majority of federal circuit courts of appeal and many state appellate courts. "You just can’t prepare as thoroughly for the individual judges, so you’re going in not as comfortable as you might be," said Williams Reynolds, JD, professor at the School of Law. "My response is, ‘tough.’ That makes you think more carefully what your real arguments are."

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500 W. Baltimore Street, Baltimore, MD 21201-1786 PHONE: (410) 706-7214 FAX: (410) 706-4045 / TDD: (410) 706-7714

Copyright © 2014, University of Maryland Francis King Carey School of Law. All Rights Reserved