Faculty in the News - Archive



Wednesday, April 26, 2006

Professor Michael Greenberger

WUSA-TV Ė Michael Greenberger, JD, professor at the School of Law and director of the Center for Health and Homeland Security, discussed the juryís deliberations about whether Sept. 11, 2001, conspirator Zacarias Moussaoui will get a death sentence or life in prison. He also commented on a case that is now before the U.S. Supreme Court that challenges lethal injections as cruel and unusual punishment.

Wednesday, April 26, 2006

Professor Michael Greenberger

WJZ-TV - For the first time, thousands of workers who haul cargo in and out of the port are being screened by the federal government. "The greatest fear is that somebody will sneak in a nuclear weapon into the port, it will be put into a truck, and it will be brought into the interior United States," says Michael Greenberger, JD, a professor in the School of Law and director of the Center for Health and Homeland Security.

Monday, April 24, 2006

Professor Richard Booth

Legal Times Ė "Itís time for Congress and the Supreme Court to ask whether our securities laws work the way they should," urges Richard Booth, JD, professor at the School of Law, in this opinion column about a case involving claims by long-term holders of a mutual fund injured by active traders of fund shares.

Wednesday, April 19, 2006

Professor Michael Greenberger

The Christian Science Monitor Ė In what could be a precedent-setting case, New Jersey and a coalition of citizens are fighting renewal of the license for the nation's oldest operating nuclear power plant, claiming that the structural design of the building makes it vulnerable in the event of a terrorist attack from the air. "Itís the height of folly...for the [Nuclear Regulatory Commission] to say that itís not going to consider seriously the vulnerability of the oldest plants when everybody knows these facilities are high-level targets," said Michael Greenberger, JD, professor at the School of Law and director of the University of Marylandís Center for Health and Homeland Security.

Wednesday, April 19, 2006

Professor Michael Greenberger

The Las Vegas Review-Journal Ė The federal government relied on inaccurate data to help justify dropping Las Vegas from a list of cities eligible for special anti-terrorism funding, according to county officials who have viewed the information. Michael Greenberger, JD, professor at the School of Law and director of the Center for Health and Homeland Security, said federal officials ultimately are to blame for any errors in the data.

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