Faculty in the News - Archive



Thursday, May 4, 2006

Visiting Professor Kerry Rodgers

The Baltimore Sun, The Capital, WTOP.com, WTOP, WAMU, WBAL-TV, WJLA-TV, WBOC-TV, WMDT-TV, WJZ.com, WJLA.com – The Environmental Law Clinic at the School of Law issued a report yesterday saying local governments often fail to enforce a landmark state law designed to protect environmentally critical areas near the Chesapeake Bay. "Local enforcement is almost entirely responsive, instead of proactive, allowing many Critical Area violations to go unnoticed," wrote Kerry Rodgers, JD, MES, visiting professor at the School of Law. "Routine, small-scale violations threaten the bay with death by a thousand cuts."

Wednesday, May 3, 2006

Professor Michael Greenberger

WUSA-TV - Michael Greenberger, JD, professor at the School of Law and director of the Center for Health and Homeland Security, discussed today’s expected release of the White House’s plan for how the government would respond to an outbreak of the bird flu.

Wednesday, May 3, 2006

Professor Abraham Dash

The Baltimore Sun – Convicted sniper Lee Malvo is negotiating a plea bargain in which he would testify against his former mentor John Muhammad, according to sources. Abraham Dash, JD, professor at the School of Law, said that even if Malvo’s past inconsistencies are brought out, prosecutors have nothing to lose by having him offer a first-person account of the shootings.

Tuesday, May 2, 2006

Professor Michael Greenberger

The Baltimore Sun – The difficulty of finding jurors in Montgomery County who have not decided that convicted sniper John Muhammad was responsible for the county’s six sniper killings in 2002 became immediately apparent yesterday as the presiding judge questioned the first batch of 300 potential jurors. "Finding jurors willing to take a fresh look at the case could take a while," said Michael Greenberger, JD, professor at the School of Law and director of the Center for Health and Homeland Security.

Tuesday, May 2, 2006

Professor Sherrilyn Ifill

The Baltimore Sun, The Daily Record – Prominent members of Maryland’s legal community, worried that hotly contested elections for judges could erode public confidence in the judiciary, announced a set of voluntary conduct standards yesterday that they hope will preserve the dignity of the office. "The U.S. Supreme Court has ruled that states may not prohibit judicial candidates from making campaign pledges or inflammatory remarks," said Sherrilyn Ifill, JD, associate professor at the School of Law who helped organize the Maryland Judicial Campaign Conduct Committee. But Ifill said the committee hopes voters will respond to candidates who voluntarily uphold higher standards. She said the committee will publicize the names of candidates who sign the pledge and of those who violate it.

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Copyright © 2014, University of Maryland Francis King Carey School of Law. All Rights Reserved