Faculty in the News - Archive



Thursday, June 1, 2006

Professor Richard Booth

The Washington Times - With 30 days to go, Baltimore Gas and Electric Co. customers still have no idea how much, or if, their electricity bills will rise July 1. Last week, a judge rejected a plan that would have spread a 72 percent rate increase for 1.2 million Baltimore-area residential customers over an 18-month period. Richard Booth, JD, professor at the School of Law, said there is nothing to prevent another lawsuit challenging a new phase-in plan.

Wednesday, May 31, 2006

Professor Michael Greenberger

WUSA-TV - Michael Greenberger, JD, a professor at the School of Law and director of the Center for Health and Homeland Security, discussed the raid of Congressman William Jefferson’s Capital Hill office and the fact that both Congress and academics are considering whether the search violates the speech and debate clause and separation of powers. Greenberger also spoke about the Supreme Court’s ruling on whistle blowers and whether they are protected under free speech rights.

Wednesday, May 31, 2006

Professor Abraham Dash

The Chicago Tribune, The Baltimore Sun – John Allen Muhammad was convicted Tuesday of murder in the 2002 sniper rampage that killed six Maryland residents, ending a trial in which his claim of being framed was eclipsed by his protégé’s portrayal of Muhammad as creator of a scheme to terrorize the nation. Abraham Dash, JD, a professor at the School of Law who was not involved in the case, said that Muhammad’s decision to represent himself turned the defense into something of a ‘farce’ but it probably did not affect the outcome of the trial. "I honestly don’t think it made that much of a difference," Dash said. "I don't think it would have made a difference if Clarence Darrow had handled things."

Wednesday, May 31, 2006

Professor Abraham Dash

The Baltimore Sun – John Allen Muhammad’s conviction in Montgomery County clears the way for murder trials in other jurisdictions where bullets from the sniper’s gun allegedly claimed victims including Louisiana, Alabama and the District of Columbia. Abraham Dash, JD, a professor at the School of Law who is not involved in the case, said he would be surprised if any other state seeks to put Muhammad on trial for crimes in its jurisdiction. "I doubt anyone else will want to go to the expense of trying him," Dash said. "With a death sentence in Virginia and a [likely] life sentence in Maryland, there would be no point."

Tuesday, May 30, 2006

Professor Michael Greenberger

WBAL-TV - The murder trial of convicted sniper John Allen Muhammad ended in Montgomery County May 30 with the jury returning a verdict of guilty on all counts. The trial is unlikely to leave many grounds for appeal, said Michael Greenberger, JD, professor at the School of Law and director of the Center for Health and Homeland Security.

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500 W. Baltimore Street, Baltimore, MD 21201-1786 PHONE: (410) 706-7214 FAX: (410) 706-4045 / TDD: (410) 706-7714

Copyright © 2014, University of Maryland Francis King Carey School of Law. All Rights Reserved