Faculty in the News - Archive



Friday, June 2, 2006

Professor Michael Greenberger

WTWP-AM - Michael Greenberger, JD, professor at the School of Law and director of the Center for Health and Homeland Security, talked about how the Department of Homeland Security has slashed anti-terrorism money for Washington and New York City, as part of a controversial decision to reduce grant funds for major urban areas in the Northeast while providing more to mid-size cities.

Thursday, June 1, 2006

Professor Lisa Fairfax

Conglomerate - Lisa Fairfax, JD, associate professor at the School of Law, has just been invited to be a permanent blogger on Conglomerate (www.theconglomerate.org), the leading blog on business law issues. (It is hosting an online forum on the Enron controversy today and tomorrow.)

Thursday, June 1, 2006

Professor Michael Greenberger

The Washington Post – The Department of Homeland Security yesterday slashed anti-terrorism money for Washington and New York, part of an immediately controversial decision to reduce grant funds for major urban areas in the Northeast while providing more to mid-size cities. Michael Greenberger, JD, director of the Center for Health and Homeland Security in the School of Law, said the plan doesn’t pass the common-sense test. "There can be no doubt that Washington and New York are the biggest potential ground zeroes for any future attack," he said.

Thursday, June 1, 2006

Kate Christensen

WBFF-TV - John Allen Muhammad was convicted Tuesday of murder in the 2002 sniper rampage that killed six Maryland residents, ending a trial in which his claim of being framed was eclipsed by his protégé’s portrayal of Muhammad as the creator of a scheme to terrorize the nation. Kate Christensen, JD, associate director of the Center for Health and Homeland Security in the School of Law, was interviewed about the case and the prospects for an appeal and more trials.

Thursday, June 1, 2006

Professor Kerry Rodgers & The Environmental Law Clinic

Bay Journal - A new report from the School of Law’s Environmental Law Clinic confirms what many Chesapeake Bay advocates in Maryland have concluded from years of personal observation: The two-decade-old Critical Area Act, one of the first major pieces of legislation to protect the Bay, isn’t working very well. The power to enforce the act, and to approve projects that don’t follow the letter of the law, rests in the hands of 61 local governments. Kerry Rodgers, JD, visiting associate professor of law, worked with four student attorneys at an Environmental Law Clinic to explore the outcome of the legislation.

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Copyright © 2014, University of Maryland Francis King Carey School of Law. All Rights Reserved