Faculty in the News - Archive



Tuesday, June 6, 2006

Professor Michael Greenberger

The Baltimore Sun – The debate over affirmative action will return to the Supreme Court this fall when the justices consider for the first time the sensitive question of whether public schools can use race as a factor in assigning children to schools, and Sandra Day O’Connor’s successor, Justice Samuel Alito, will play a key role in the deliberations. "I think most people believe that Alito is not going to be as hospitable to the importance of diversity as O’Connor was," said Michael Greenberger, JD, professor at the School of Law. "This could be a case where a wholesale attempt will be made to head down a different path."

Tuesday, June 6, 2006

Professor Larry Gibson

WBAL-TV, WJZ-TV, The Baltimore Examiner – State lawmakers unveiled an exhibit at Baltimore/Washington International Thurgood Marshall Airport that honors the accomplishments of the airport’s namesake. Larry Gibson, LLB, professor at the School of Law, organized the exhibit and contributed some of his personal photographs and momentos to it. "I’d like to thank, for their years of support for my research, Dean Karen Rothenberg and the University of Maryland School of Law, the law school to which Marshall did not apply, but if he had applied, he would have been rejected due to race," said Gibson.

Monday, June 5, 2006

Professor Michael Greenberger

USA Today – Schools cracking down on students who plot violent attacks against classmates and educators are increasingly turning to a new form of prosecution: charging the suspects as terrorists. Michael Greenberger, JD, professor at the School of Law and director of the Center for Health and Homeland Security, says that although terrorism charges may be appropriate in domestic attacks such as the 2002 sniper shootings around Washington, D.C., charging troubled teenagers as terrorists "cheapens the war on terror."

Monday, June 5, 2006

Professor Richard Booth

The Washington Times – Maryland officials are scaring off investment in the state with such anti-business moves as the court-ordered scrutiny of Baltimore Gas & Electric Company’s energy rates and the law that forces Wal-Mart to pay employee health benefits, business leaders say. "That does suggest sort of a trend in Maryland that is probably not the best way to attract business," said Richard Booth, JD, professor at the School of Law.

Sunday, June 4, 2006

Professor Michael Greenberger

Newsday – The federal government cut anti-terrorism funds to New York City by 40 percent because of fundamentally different views on how the money should be spent, according to documents obtained by Newsday and interviews with homeland security experts. New York needs "personnel, they need boots on the ground," said Michael Greenberger, JD, professor at the School of Law and director of the Center for Health and Homeland Security. "I don’t think [the Homeland Security Department] ever put New York on notice that looking for boots on the ground wasn’t going to fly."

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500 W. Baltimore Street, Baltimore, MD 21201-1786 PHONE: (410) 706-7214 FAX: (410) 706-4045 / TDD: (410) 706-7714

Copyright © 2014, University of Maryland Francis King Carey School of Law. All Rights Reserved