Faculty in the News - Archive



Saturday, June 10, 2006

Professor Robin Wilson

The New York Times – The constitutional amendment banning same-sex marriage died in the Senate last week, but many civil liberties experts are raising the possibility that same-sex marriage is on a collision course with religious liberty. A paper presented by Robin Wilson, JD, associate professor at the School of Law, at a conference on the issue, is cited about how exemptions that arose in the wake of the legalization of abortion might also arise for same-sex marriage.

Friday, June 9, 2006

School of Law

C-SPAN 2 – Claudia McMurray, deputy assistant secretary for the environment at the U.S. Department of State’s Bureau of Oceans and International Environmental and Scientific Affairs, gave the keynote luncheon address at the American Bar Association’s Standing Committee on Environmental Law’s annual spring conference at the School of Law.

Thursday, June 8, 2006

Professor Michael Greenberger

Asbury Park Press - Schools cracking down on students who plot violent attacks against classmates and educators are increasingly turning to a new form of prosecution: charging the suspects as terrorists. Michael Greenberger, JD, professor at the School of Law and director of the Center for Health and Homeland Security, says that although terrorism charges may be appropriate in domestic attacks such as the 2002 sniper shootings around Washington, D.C., charging troubled teenagers as terrorists "cheapens the war on terror."

Thursday, June 8, 2006

Professor Michael Greenberger

The Capital – The U.S. Department of Homeland Security announced last week that Maryland will receive about $24 million for Fiscal Year 2007 down by 42 percent from $42 million this year. Michael Greenberger, JD, professor at the School of Law and director of the Center for Health and Homeland Security, called the amount "inexplicable" and "a slap in the face." Members of his staff helped state officials prepare the grant request. Greenberger said Maryland is "ahead of the curve" in areas such as interoperable communications and mass transportation sites, but the state needs more help from the federal government.

Thursday, June 8, 2006

Professor Renee Hutchins

The Baltimore Sun – Baltimore prosecutors have dropped murder charges against a suspect because they say the police officer who arrested him did not have permission to read a text message on the man’s cell phone in which he allegedly confessed to the crime. Renee Hutchins, JD, assistant professor at the School of Law, gave this analogy of the cell phone search: Giving an officer permission to look through your pocketbook does not entitle the officer to look through a closed wallet within that pocketbook. "Those are distinct items," she said. "Allowing an officer to look through your phone’s contacts does not give him the right to look through other parts of the phone’s memory."

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Copyright © 2014, University of Maryland Francis King Carey School of Law. All Rights Reserved